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ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

Libor 2.0 and a £10bn UK-US trade agreement

Over the weekend…
we saw the first proposal for a Libor reform from Martin Wheatley of the FCA (Financial Conduct Authority and successor of the FSA), who told the FT about the Libor 2.0, which could look something like this:

[…] a dual-track system with survey-based lending rates running alongside transaction-linked indices as soon as next year.

In the US however, Gary Gensler of the CFTC calls for an immediate switch to transaction-linked rates. read Financial Times

Meanwhile, the G7 met just outside London to talk about monetary policy and how much liquidity is too much with the conclusion that money is something you can never have enough of: Go ahead Japan, ease some more. read Businessweek

In the US, WSJ correspondent Jon Hilsenrath published two articles on the future of the Fed, both in terms of staffing and monetary policy. Until yesterday, Friday’s article (read ZeroHedge annotations) was pretty much the most talked about news of the weekend, discussing how the central bank will unwind its QE program that is worth $85bn a month. It was followed it up with a piece on Janet Yellen, [probably] the next Ben Bernanke. read Friday’s Wall Street Journal read Sunday’s Wall Street Journal

This morning…

David Cameron is meeting with Barack Obama on future trade agreements, something that is being interpreted as a potential first step for the UK to leave the EU. A free trade agreement between the new and old world could be worth up to £10bn for the British economy. read Bloomberg

The Eurogroup is kicking of with both Cyprus and Greece on the agenda. Cyprus is seeking approval of the first chunk of its bailout program, worth €3bn, while Greece is set to receive €7.5bn in the latest bailout payment. read BBC read comment on Reuters MacroScope

As for the rest of the week, we’ll get all kinds of data from the US, including industrial production and inflation and housing. Same goes for the eurozone and Germany; the UK reports unemployment figures and Japan will give us preliminary Q1 GDP figures.

So long.

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Portugal could need second bailout (to pay for the first)

This morning…

the Eurogroup is meeting in Dublin; on the menu: stop messing around with bank stress tests (i.e. tighten measures) and the bailout schemes of Portugal and Ireland. Some say even if Portugal was granted an extension of its bailout repayment, it could potentially face a second collapse and thus a second bailout. Ireland is looking in the same gloomy direction. According to the FT:

Lisbon’s bailout is due to come to an end in July 2014 and the extension of maturities of its bailout loans is intended to smooth its full return to markets. But it has to raise €14,1bn next year and €15bn in 2015, whereas before the crisis it was typically raising €10-€12bn a year. Ireland is also facing a big financing challenge. It needs to refinance €20bn per year from 2016-20, which is about 12 per cent of the country’s projected economic output for this year.

Thus, the world is quiet in anticipation of next week’s news country of choice. It might be early days for Slovenia, so maybe it’ll drift back to Cyprus or Italy.

Meanwhile, Japan will officially enter the Asia-Pacific trade talks this summer, which are currently held between Canada, Mexico, Australia, Chile, Peru, Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam, Brunei and the US. read article

Weekend reading…
– The Economist on Margaret Thatcher‘s legacy, read article

– William Cohan on the revolving door between Wall Street and the White House, read article

Climate change may double turbulence on transatlantic flights, read article

– The Winklevoss twins are all over bitcoin, read article

JPMorgan explains why you should avoid investment banks, read article

Have a good one.

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Cyprus to sell €400m in gold; bailout to total €23bn

Yesterday…
Barack Obama submitted a budget proposal to Congress, totalling $3.77tn and including policies to curb social security and medicare expenses. The proposal foresees a $744bn deficit for 2014. read article

While the minutes from the latest Federal Open Market Committee meeting were expected today, they were accidentally sent out early to lobbyists, Citigroup and Goldman Sachs. Oops. The notes supported the thesis that the Fed’s QE program could end by year-end 2014, given improvements in the job market. read article

This morning…
Over in Cyprus, €400m worth of gold are up for sale, as the country has to up its contributions to the bailout program that so far consists of €9bn from European institutions and €1bn from the IMF. Another €10.9bn will free up in the winding down of Laiki Bank. And yes, all that money, €23bn, will be needed to just keep the country afloat until the beginning of 2016. read article

China has seen a massive influx of foreign capital. In Q1 of this year, the country’s forex reserves exploded to $3.44tn from only $130bn in the previous quarter. New financing grew by 58% from the same period last year. read article

Next door in Japan, central bank governor Kuroda said the BoJ had done all it could at this point, and the asset purchasing program wouldn’t be expanded any further any time soon. read article

So long.

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Obama to unveil $3.77tn budget

Yesterday…Slovenia‘s new Prime Minister Alenka Bratusek said the country didn’t require any help to deal with its banking crisis that the OECD seems to consider as serious but not urgent. Many Slovenian banks are already owned by the state; the OECD has recommended stress tests and the potential recapitalization or closure of failing institutions, but Bratusek is having none of it, saying the bad bank that will be set up until early summer will be able to take the toxic assets. read article

This morning…
EU is considering extending the bailout programs for Ireland and Portugal. According to Reuters, where this story came from, this will be discussed at the Eurogroup meeting on Friday.

To make everything worse, the ECB’s [first ever] Household Finance and Consumption Survey found that the average Cypriot is richer than the average German (by median net wealth). Even though the classic North-South divide re-appears in the median gross income figures, that won’t go down too well. read article

China reported its first trade deficit in over a year for March 2013, again it could be another hangover from the Lunar New Year holiday, leading to increased imports, while exports grew less. read article

Meanwhile in the US, President Obama will unveil a $3.77tn budget plan at 11am EST today, when he will speak from the White House. read article

So long.

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IMF joins Cyprus creditors; Fannie Mae records first profits in 6 years

There won’t be an update tomorrow, Thursday April 4th.

Yesterday…In the US, people are getting more nervous about the Fed’s spending spree. Eyeing over to Japan, that might be fair. Once again, it’s Jeffrey Lacker, President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, who doesn’t beat around the bush when it comes to disliking monetary policy. read article

Fannie Mae, which received a total of $116.1bn in bailout finance from the US Treasury since the financial crisis, officially returned back to black. For the financial year 2012, the mortgage business recorded $17.2bn in profit. Finally. Although things are looking up, $84.7bn of its bailout package remain outstanding. read article

Speaking of earnings, the SEC has given companies the okay to announce earnings and other news via Facebook and Twitter, throwing off all those institutions (read banks) that blocked social networking sites for their employees. read article

Cyprus’ Minister of Finance resigned, saying he had done his deed in negotiating the bailout deal. In related news, the IMF stated today that it will pay €1bn of the total €10bn bailout package for Cyrpus, spread out over three years.

This morning…
there’s little to talk about. By 9.45am the most striking news were that Apple may release two new phones this year, and even that was a story from yesterday. read article

Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy is looking towards Brussels to get the growth in Europe going (good luck with that) and stop the austerity vise (even more luck for that), asking for countries in the position to do so to spend more to stimulate the economy. read article

So long.

Death Star Economics
ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

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US housing improving, Europe worsening as a whole

Over the long weekend…Starting positive, the US saw the release of some positive housing data, the “highest level of home building in more than four years”, while factory activity declined. read article

In Europe on the other hand, manufacturing went down down down across the board, yes, even Germany. According to Reuters, Cyprus is not the culprit. Maybe March was an outlier and the global recovery is still going strong *cough*. Other European data showed a steady 12% seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for the eurozone in Feburary. For the entire union, this number increased by 0.1% to 10.9%.

It’s only been a week and Cyprus, clearly coached by Greece, has already managed to have its bailout terms eased. The Wall Street Journal got hold of a document showing that the country will have until 2017 ( as opposed to 2016) to reach a 4% budget surplus. As for the capital controls put in place to prevent a bank run after tellers were open for business again on Thursday, may last for more than a week, according to Cyprus central bank governor Panicos Demetriades (see below).

Another country shifting around on the brink of collapse, Argentina, is trying to impress (read distract) its loyal (read angry) bondholders with a new deal: instead of discussing the repayment of old bonds per se, new bonds (different for retail and institutional investors) could be issued and paid off in about 25 years. Where do I sign, that sounds like a great idea. read article

This morning…
The week ahead looks quiet yet depressing, at least if you’re in Europe, but I will spend as much time as possible laughing about Demetriades first name PANICos.

On Thursday will be central banking day, with the Bank of Japan, Bank of England and European Central Bank holding their policy meetings.

Finally, today marks the death of the FSA as we know it and the advent of the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority. The former is an independent shop supervising more or less everybody in financial services (brokers, traders, secretaries, markets…), while the latter is part of the bank of England and will focus on 1,700 banks, insurers and investment firms. read article

Have a good week.

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Cypriot banks re-open, German unemployment higher

Yesterday…
word got out that UK banks Lloyds and Royal Bank of Scotland, both backed by tax money, needed to raise an additional £9bn in correspondence to capital requirements set by international banking regulators. The additional cash needs to be on the balance sheets (£3bn for Lloyds, £6bn for RBS) by the end of this year. read article

This morning…
Cyprus is making history by being the first EU country to impose restrictions on capital flows, “with limits on credit card transactions, daily withdrawals, money transfers abroad and the cashing of cheques.” The withdrawal limit seems to be €300 per day, while transfers of more than €5,000 will require central bank approval. read article

German unemployment rose by 13,000 people, as opposed to an expected drop, while German 10-year bunds dropped to their lowest yield since early August 2012 (1.255%).

Meanwhile in Asia, the Bank of Japan has already exceeded its self-imposed limit on asset purchasing limit (well done) and South Korea cut its 2013 growth forecast from 3% to 2.3%.

Easter reading… – a list of people who are investigating JP Morgan, read article
– what extremely successful people were doing in their 20s, read article
– greatness of nations: India vs China, read article

Happy Easter, have a good one.

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Laiki depositors to lose up to 80%, Poland turns against euro

Yesterday…The Spanish central bank forecasts its economy to contract by 1.5% in 2013, while unemployment is seen to rise to close to 30%:

The economy will be marked by weak domestic demand, a fragile labor market and tight financial conditions, the bank said.” read article

Meanwhile in Poland, Prime Minister Donald Tusk is floating the idea of a euro referendum. The country has been pushing to join the foreign currency pretty much as long as it has existed – proximity to Germany would bring an additional trade advantage (despite the disadvantage for cheap manual labor). Anyway, now Poland is not so sure anymore. The political opposition claims the eurozone has changed too much since 2004, when the country joined, for a decisions to possibly still be valid. read article

The US economy must be improving, because it’s not getting worse. That was the idea of the morale following the data announcement of January home prices rising at the fastest rate since summer 2006 and an increasing demand for durable goods. read article

In other news, the Financial Times has found that the group of AAA-rated countries has decreased by 60% since 2007, and Warren Buffet will become one of Goldman Sachs’ ten biggest investors after exercising some warrants issued in 2008. read article

This morning…
Cyprus‘ central bank announced some details on the impending haircuts, saying uninsured deposits at Cyprus Popular Bank (Laiki) could be cut by 4/5th. The estimated 40% haircut seems to remain the benchmark for larger insured deposits. According to WSJ:

Based on estiamtes from government officials, the losses would affect some 19,000 deposit-holders at the Bank of Cyprus who, combined, hold some €8.01 billion in uninsured deposits. Uninsured savers at Cyprus Popular Bank, who hold a combined €3.2 billion, will lose most of that.

The Bank of England said British banks were facing a £25bn capital shortfall with regards to compliance with new banking standards. read article

So long.

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Cypriot capital controls, EU templates and Japanese QE

Yesterday…
Cyprus‘ President Nicos Anastasiades announced that the country’s banks are going to stay closed until Thursday (again: which Thursday…) and that capital controls will be put in place until it all blows over. read article

The new head of the Eurogroup, Dutch Finance Minister Jeroen Dijsselbloem, threw everyone for a loop by saying the private sector contribution in Cyprus (i.e. the haircuts) would lead future EU bailouts by example. He retracted the comment later on. Thanks for that.

The MSCI Emerging Markets Index has had the worst first quarter since 2008, lagging behind industrial economies most since 1998. Ongoing QE programs (see below for Japan) are cited as a reason in favor of developed markets. read article

Presumably not for the same reason, the BRICS nations are planning their own version of the World Bank. read article

Meanwhile, China is finding itself in a public health crisis, with rotten ducks floating down rivers in the southwestern Sichuan province and 11,000 dead pigs being fished out of Shanghai’s water supply system. read article

Otherwise, a 17 year-old British kid has sold its bedroom-developed app Summly to Yahoo for $30m. read article

This morning…
there’s not a whole lot going on except digesting overnight news, because most people, including myself, got nothing but chocolate eggs on their minds.

New Bank of Japan Governor Haruhiko Kuroda is already warming up the printers, saying the BoJ will consider buying five-year+ bonds. The next policy meeting is next week, April 3-4.

So long.

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Cyprus to exit the news

Over the weekend…

actually right before, Fitch but the UK on its watchlist for downgrades.

The United States Congress is working on reforming the taxability of debt and equity, changing the traditional debt-bias (i.e. tax-deductible interest payments) to an equity-bias. read article

The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision received at hat tip that there was a MASSIVE loophole in the Basel III regulation that imposes, among other things, higher capital standards on banks. What it doesn’t regulate, however, is the use of credit default swaps to handle riskier assets that count into those capital standards. Changes to be made. read article

Speaking of Basel – after Switzerland came under scrutiny (again) by facilitating tax avoidance, the US Department of Justice has now asked Lichtenstein to hand over documentation of American-held accounts. read article

Over night…

The Eurogroup of Finance Ministers approved troika-sponsored bailout plan for Cyprus, totalling €10bn. In short, bank deposits under €100,000 will be guaranteed, while larger deposits are facing a crazy haircut, possibly up to 40% (others say the cuts will be capped at 20%). After ten days closure, Cypriot banks re-open todayread article

And let’s not forget that besides all this, we’re still waiting on Italy.

Have a good week.

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