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ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

US payrolls estimate up; Twitter IPO rumors back

Yesterday…
the ECB shook up Europe for a moment, with government debt yields falling to new lows under the soothing sound of disgruntled murmuring Germans. The ECB is ready for more [again], it says, but Germans on the policy committee are going to do everything to keep rates from tumbling. In ze mozerland, Economists are scared of a real estate bubble and argue that banks could use the freshly pressed money to bolster their equity capital, dragging the effect away from the real economy. read FT read Die Zeit

This morning…
The EU deficit report came out, showing that France, Spain and the Netherlands will breach deficit agreements, limiting countries to 3%. Italy got in just below at 2.9% (based on 2013 forecast). Because France and the Netherlands aren’t the real bad guys, and you can’t leave one standing alone in the rain (unless it’s Greece), all of them are expected to receive extensions for reaching their deficit goals. France got its waiver this morning. read FT read Reuters

Its jobs Friday in the US: nonfarm payrolls are seen up at 148,000 (almost double), with the unemployment rate unchanged at 7.6%. But stakes are high as the estimates vary within a range of 90,000 jobs added. March payrolls came in below estimates, for example, but jobless claims have been declining over the past weeks. After the jobs report, there will be April non-manufacturing PMI, which is expected to fall slightly to 54. Data releases begin at 8.30am EST. read WSJ

In the background, rumors of Twitter’s IPO are going wild after the company hired Morgan Stanley’s Cynthia Gaylor for corporate development, despite co-founder Jack Dorsey saying he was “not even thinking” about going public. read Bloomberg read Bloomberg (Dorsey)

On Monday, the UK will be out for the early May bank holiday.

Weekend reading…IvyConnect: is a ‘fascinating individual’ necessarily a douchebag? read Bloomberg
– the real culprits behind the Libor scandal are London broker nights, read WSJ
– ze Germans are gestuck with the Euro, read Bloomberg
– stripped off the alter ego: ex-Barclays CEO Bob Diamond takes the subway now, read NYTimes
– terrorism, conspiracy and the media, read New York Magazine

Have a good one.

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Europe is the new Japan – ECB cuts rates

Yesterday…The Fed’s FOMC meeting notes showed that we’re moving away from the “let’s close the money tap” idea and back to “whatever it takes” – meaning easing or no easing. The statement said that policy action will be taken with an eye on how the economy will progress. read Alphaville (interestingly, Matthew Yglesias of Slate has interpreted this as a call for stimulus)

Apple‘s mega bond of $17m helps the company to avoid $9bn in taxes. If Apple would have had to bring in money from abroad to pay dividends to shareholders, that’s what it would have cost them. Of course, the average Apple customer, like me, doesn’t care about tax avoidance (it’s not even illegal), but the American state is upset, as it’s trying to crack down on offshore tax avoidance like never before this year. read FT

Otherwise, an infographic to yesterday’s ADP employment report. view graphic

This morning…
all eyes are on the ECB, which just announced a benchmark interest rate cut by a quarter point to 0.50%. A press conference during which Mario Draghi will wear a suit made of money is set to follow at 1.30 BST. Let the excitement begin. Money for everyone.

UBS is holding an investor meeting today, during which the bank may be urged to split its investment banking and wealth management units [again]. read Reuters

So long.

Death Star Economics
ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

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US budget deficit decreases; ECB rate cut likely

Yesterday…
The IMF warned of the Asian bubble, saying too much FDI was leading to explosive credit growth and property prices, and it was to get even worse if Japan’s monetary policy was to have the intended effect on the Japanese economy (hold your horses, Christine). read FT

Deutsche Bank is issuing €2.8bn of new stock to improve its capital base. According to WSJ, Deutsche Bank has one of the lowest capital ratios among European banks. read WSJ

This morning…
The Dutch Queen Beatrix abdicated, to be replaced by her son Willem-Alexander. She will be demoted to Princess Beatrix. read BBC

The US Treasury is expecting the first lowering of the budget deficit since 2007 between April and June 2013, when it is looking to repay $35bn, against the February estimate of shouldering another $103bn in debt. The deficit cut is due to tax increases, spending cuts and tax revenues recoveries. read FT

There was a whole flood of data out of Europe this morning: both Eurozone and German inflation came in at 1.2%, lower than expected, making a rate cut by the ECB on Thursday more likely. German unemployment added to its rise in March, but the adjusted rate is still only marginally above the two-decade low of 6.8%. Eurozone unemployment climbed to 12.1%. No surprise there, when has it not been rising… read Alphaville

Spain reported GDP growth for the first quarter – keyword ‘growth’ – at -0.5%, leading the Bank of Spain to lower it 2013 growth expectations from -0.5% to -1.3%. read CNBC

So long.

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Spain turns to stimuli, as Merkel points to two-tier Europe

Yesterday…
Spain’s unemployment rate rose to a new high of 27.2%, possibly marking the final point that austerity measures haven’t work in this case or simply don’t work at all (hello, Keynesians). Between January and March, almost 240,000 people lost their jobs. read BBC
Following the announcement, Mariano Rajoy announced the government would lay low on cuts and tax hikes, as even though the deficit has shrunk, the country is doing miserable. Stimulus for everyone! read WSJ

The UK dodged the bullet on a triple-drip recession, reporting first quarter GDP growth of 0.3% from the previous quarter

This morning…
Angela Merkel stirred the European debate with remarks about the potential impending rate cut by the ECB. Merkel pointed out that country’s like Germany actually needed a rate increase, while other country’s required further easing, underlining the divide between functional and dysfunctional Europe.

In Italy, coalition building is underway. Prime Minister-to be Enrico Letta said the conservatives would have to work out a compromise regarding the property tax that Berlusconi promised to get rid off before joining the coalition.

Today, the US is announcing first quarter GDP growth, which is expected to come in at 3% from the final quarter of 2012. Over the next three months, this number will be revised three times, once due to the change in government statistics in late July. read WSJ

In Japan, consumer prices have fallen fastest in two years in March, which doesn’t really come as a surprise considering all the excess liquidity in the system. Prices fell 0.5% on the year, slightly more than expected. read Bloomberg

Weekend reading:
Italy’s new heads of state – an evalution, read The Economist
– meet Janet “anti-inflation” Yellen, possibly the next head of the Fed, read NYTimes
– why the city of Los Angeles is suing Deutsche Bank, read Businessweek
real bad boys smuggle dairy, read Bloomberg

Have a good one.

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Letta new Italian PM; Apple profits drop for first time in decade

Yesterday…
It was a dark day for the European economy, with April PMIs across the globe disappointed, except for France, which beat expectations and soared to four-months highs. China and Germany on the other hand, undercut expectations – Germany even fell below the magic mark of 50, to 48.8, the lowest level in six months. read Bloomberg

After all the united G20 talk of appropriate monetary measures, S&P said that there’s a 30+% chance that Japan will lose its AA rating. The reasoning: it’s great to have quantitative easing, stimuli and private sector involvement, but that strategy doesn’t work if all you do is print money. read Reuters

Meanwhile in Portugal, the government is planning to lower corporate taxes to attract business. Good timing. read WSJ

Right after close, the Twitter account of the Associated Press was hacked, posting a tweet about attacks on the White House. The Syrian Electronic Army claimed responsibility. read Alphaville read BBC

Otherwise, it was all about Apple. The tech giant posted first quarter earnings,showing that profits dropped for the first time in a decade in year-on-year comparison. Alongside quarterly results, the company also announced an expansion to its now $100bn share buyback program to return money to investors. read WSJ

This morning…
Italy is set to announce a new Prime Minister. The current candidates are Guiliano Amato (Prime Minister 1992-1993 and 200-2001), Matteo Renzi (Mayor of Florance) and Enrico Letta (center-left deputy leader), all of which are less crazy than Berlusconi and none of which have worked for Goldman Sachs. read Reuters
BREAKING: Enrico Letta set to become Italy’s new prime minister

In anticipation on next week’s ECB meeting, rumor has it the Mario Draghi is likely to cut another quarter of a point off current interest rates, as inflation rates are below target and the eurozone finds itself back in recession. read Reuters

So long.

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Obama to unveil $3.77tn budget

Yesterday…Slovenia‘s new Prime Minister Alenka Bratusek said the country didn’t require any help to deal with its banking crisis that the OECD seems to consider as serious but not urgent. Many Slovenian banks are already owned by the state; the OECD has recommended stress tests and the potential recapitalization or closure of failing institutions, but Bratusek is having none of it, saying the bad bank that will be set up until early summer will be able to take the toxic assets. read article

This morning…
EU is considering extending the bailout programs for Ireland and Portugal. According to Reuters, where this story came from, this will be discussed at the Eurogroup meeting on Friday.

To make everything worse, the ECB’s [first ever] Household Finance and Consumption Survey found that the average Cypriot is richer than the average German (by median net wealth). Even though the classic North-South divide re-appears in the median gross income figures, that won’t go down too well. read article

China reported its first trade deficit in over a year for March 2013, again it could be another hangover from the Lunar New Year holiday, leading to increased imports, while exports grew less. read article

Meanwhile in the US, President Obama will unveil a $3.77tn budget plan at 11am EST today, when he will speak from the White House. read article

So long.

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Obama ready to cut social security for budget deal

Yesterday…
it was all about central banks: the Bank of Japan expanded its asset purchasing program to JPY7tn per month, which will increase the Japanese monetary base to JPY270tn – double – by early 2014. read article

Both the Bank of England and the ECB left their policies alone. Mario Draghi shared mixed views of the European economy, saying it was to benefit from improving financial markets sometime soon, while bank lending was negative and needed encouraging. Interest rate cuts are possible again.

This morning…
we’re waiting for US non-farm payrolls, expected to show 190,000-200,000 jobs added in March (according to Bloomberg and Dow Jones respectively), as opposed to 236,000 in February, with a steady unemployment rate of 7.7. read article

President Obama is willing to cut social security spending to finally get a budget deal together, the White House announced this morning. The new proposal would see cuts worth $1.8tn over the next decade and will piss off a lot of Democrats and unions. read article

Weekend reading…
women and Wall Street (again) read article
– why the French are an un’appy folk, read article
– the deal with interest rates, read article

Have a good weekend.

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Brussels vs Moscow, and Bernanke leaving the Fed

Yesterday…

the Federal Reserve confirmed its asset purchasing program worth $85bn per month to continue until the US economy would improve past the first scarce signs of recovery. read article

Ben Bernanke also alluded to leaving the Fed to pursue other projects, retirement for example. read article

The UK budget saw five more years of spending cuts, right past the 2015 elections to alleviate the country from its £121bn budget deficit and ensure its credit rating. The Office of Budget Responsibility expects 2013 growth to be at 0.6%, followed by 1.8% in 2014read article

Elsewhere, this happened over the course of yesterday: Cyprus’ Finance Minister conferred with Russia, while Angela Merkel said Cypriot banks had to chip in for the bailout, followed by Brussels saying that Cyprus had to present its own refinancing plan after voting against the EU proposal. It all looked like we had a new credible exit candidate until Cyprus asked for more time to come up with a better idea. Now it just looks like Greece. Here are four scenarios that could unfold over the coming days and weeks.

This morning…

The European Central Bank announced that Cyprus had until 25 March, coming Monday, to get its bailout plan ready without losing access to the ECB’s Emergency Liquidity Assistance (ELA) that keeps the island’s banks alive. read article

Finally, China released some promising manufacturing data, showing the sector expand faster than expected and giving the recovery hypothesis more support. read article

So long.

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A bailout with a side of bank-run

Good morning, due to new commitments Death Star Economics gets up early now.

After Cyprus exploded in such an unexpected fashion on Monday, followed by the revision of the bank account levy proposal assigning a 15% tax on deposits above €500,000 and a closing of all banks until Thursday [making ZeroHedge wonder which Thursday…], which was then followed by the Cypriot parliament rejecting the proposal altogether. In the background, Russia has appeared on a white horse, sending Gazprom to offer to bail the country out for nothing butaccess to its natural resources [and money laundering facilities]. Cyprus’ Finance Minister is currently in Moscow.

In the background, the EU reached a provisional deal on the ECB’s role as single bank supervisor in the Union. Once in place, the reformed central bank could bail out European banks directly. read article

It’s budget day in the UK today, and once again it won’t be pretty. Expected are 2% spendingcuts, totalling £2.5bn. Also, inflation sits at 2.8% in February and in-coming Bank of England Governor Mark Carney wants to focus on more indicators than just getting that number down. There is the possibility that the budget will steer the BoE bank onto the 2% inflation target courseread article

BlackRock, the largest asset manager in the world, is set to restructure the firm and fire 300 people, about 3% of its global workforce. read article

In regulatory news, Citigroup has to pay $730m in settlement fees for misleading investors in mortgage-related (read “-backed”) securities between 2006 and 2008. Crisis-era legal case #765.read article

UBS decided to leave the panel that sets the Euribor benchmark rate. Previously, Rabobank, Raiffeisen Bank, Bayrische Landesbank and Citi had left the panel. read article

Have a good day.

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The next thing – gold price fixing

Things to know today: The new pope is Argentinian (or Argentine if you will) and the first non-European in 1,272 years; the US continues to fail at making the budget happen; Libor, Euribor, now gold and silver, ALL PRICES ARE FIXED.

The US is seeing Republican and Democratic budget proposals this week, with the former having been released on Tuesday. So far so good, surely a compromise can be found, right? No. In an interview with ABC Obama admitted that the two proposals may be too different to be combined in any shape or form, particularly if the Republican idea only relies on cutting social security and healthcare benefits. read article

The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) has begun an inquiry in the gold and silver market in London. Though not a ‘real’ investigation yet, the Commission is looking into price fixing, much as they did with Libor. The banks involved in gold price setting in London are BarclaysDeutsche BankHSBCBank of Nova Scotia and Societe Generaleread article

The troika, composed of the EU, ECB and IMF, has decided to delay the latest bailout tranche for Greece, worth €2.8bn, due to “outstanding issues”. One of these could be firing public servants:

Identifying redundant positions and putting in place a system that will lead to mandatory exits for about 150,000 civil servants by 2015 is a so-called milestone that will determine whether the country gets a 2.8 billion-euro aid instalment due this month.

Otherwise, Eurostat released a handful of data including rising Greek youth unemployment (record) and low overall European employment (lowest since 2006). In Brussels, the European leader summit has begun. Rumor has it that France, Spain and Portugal will get more time to shrink their deficitsread article

So long.

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