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ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

Jeffrey Osborne has left the building

This week…

Was mostly about Ben Bernanke and the path of macro conditions he chose for the coming month. So QE could be gone for good sometime next year, given supporting data, that we are now waiting for under sweat and tears. read Alphaville

In fact, Bernanke himself could be gone as well, as Obama indicated that the chairman could retire in the near future. read Financial Times

Economists polled by Bloomberg now suggest that the cutting will begin in September, to be finished by June 2014. A tight schedule considering when the rumors started. read Bloomberg

And if that’s not enough for you, there is always China and the fear of worse days ahead, pointing towards a credit squeeze. In short (by WSJ):

Early Friday, rates in China’s money markets fell sharply on rumors that Beijing had ordered its big banks to loosen up cash. Still, they remain more than double than average for the year, and the turbulence suggest continued uncertainty in the market in coming days.

Probably equally noteworthy was the G8 meeting in Northern Ireland, the possibly biggest take-away from which was that Barack Obama kept referring to George Osborne as “Jeffrey Osborne“. read Financial Times

Jeffrey Osborne himself, an American soul singer, proceeded to offer George a duet, which was turned down because the Chancellor neither laughs nor sings. read BBC

In Turkey, things are getting interesting for bankers, Erdogan‘s new found enemy. According to the prime minister, the recent crisis was due to the “interest-rates lobby” trying to push yields up. To put this in perspective, the words “blood-sucking” were used, although government officials refrained from sea food comparisons. read Bloomberg

Next week…

The US brings us June consumer confidence data (Tuesday), which is expected to have dropped from May, while consumer spending (Thursday) is meant to have increased slightly; the latest first quarter GDP reading will come in on Wednesday and is expected flat at 2.4%. Jobless claims are published on Thursday morning.

There is whole array of business climate and consumer confidence indicators as well as inflation data due in Europe, including Germany, France, Italy and the eurozone as such are, while the UK is also reporting first quarter GDP growth and the current account deficit.

Japan is due to report on unemployment and indeflation. On Wednesday, Japan reported higher May exports than expected, export value increased the most since 2010, indicating that Abenomics are working. And you say currency wars do no good. On that note, read Bloomberg

Have a good one.

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An attempt at revival

This week…

Things in Turkey continued to be messy, as Erdogan’s stern view of protesters continues to spark new anger among the masses and sent the Turkish Lira falling. read Bloomberg
On Thursday, Erdogan re-iterated that he was losing patience with the protestors. Today, the government and its counter movement reached an agreement, while Germany delayed further EU accession talks with Turkey. read WSJ

In Greece, the doors of Hellenic Broadcasting Corp closed, sending 2,500 former employees out onto the streets. It is meant to be relaunched later this year in a slimmed-down version. read WSJ

In the UK, jobless claims dropped, suggesting that the recovery is well on its way (remember how we’ve been here roughly 700 hundred times now..?). read Bloomberg

And then there was Wednesday, when literally everyone with an audience called the bond bubble, for example Jim O’Neill (formerly of Goldman Sachs) and Bill Gross (Pimco)

Around the same time, Iraqi officials said the country was looking to increase its oil production by 29% in 2014 and 159% by 2020, showing that a) they can and b) they have buyers. read Emerging Frontiers

Then there was a new price fixing scandal [yes, there are still some products left]; this time in FX. read Felix Salmon

Meanwhile on Wall Street, notes on correlations with Japan: read WSJ

In Brussels, important issues like the size and curviture of bananas and cucumbers has been pushed aside as Washington’s lobbyists walked in to ensure EU privacy regulations wouldn’t get so strict that they could hurt US investigations overseas. read FT

Rupert Murdoch is divorcing Wendy Deng, could this be the actual reason for splitting News Corp? read New Yorker

The week ahead…

The G8 meet on the outskirts of London on Monday and Tuesday; anti-globalization protesters will ironically stick to central London, where they will follow a scavenger hunt-like course through the West end, mapped out here. Please refrain from buying condiments at Fortnum & Mason until the weekend, as you may otherwise be questioned about the social legitimacy of your job.

Otherwise, it’s going to be a Bernanke-dominated week – again – as the Fed is meeting and press conferencing. Although Bernanke tried to nullify the comments about an end of easing, saying that it would take “considerable” time until that would happen, everybody seems to think the US is going to turn the money tap off. read WSJ

Have a good one.

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Libor 2.0 and a £10bn UK-US trade agreement

Over the weekend…
we saw the first proposal for a Libor reform from Martin Wheatley of the FCA (Financial Conduct Authority and successor of the FSA), who told the FT about the Libor 2.0, which could look something like this:

[…] a dual-track system with survey-based lending rates running alongside transaction-linked indices as soon as next year.

In the US however, Gary Gensler of the CFTC calls for an immediate switch to transaction-linked rates. read Financial Times

Meanwhile, the G7 met just outside London to talk about monetary policy and how much liquidity is too much with the conclusion that money is something you can never have enough of: Go ahead Japan, ease some more. read Businessweek

In the US, WSJ correspondent Jon Hilsenrath published two articles on the future of the Fed, both in terms of staffing and monetary policy. Until yesterday, Friday’s article (read ZeroHedge annotations) was pretty much the most talked about news of the weekend, discussing how the central bank will unwind its QE program that is worth $85bn a month. It was followed it up with a piece on Janet Yellen, [probably] the next Ben Bernanke. read Friday’s Wall Street Journal read Sunday’s Wall Street Journal

This morning…

David Cameron is meeting with Barack Obama on future trade agreements, something that is being interpreted as a potential first step for the UK to leave the EU. A free trade agreement between the new and old world could be worth up to £10bn for the British economy. read Bloomberg

The Eurogroup is kicking of with both Cyprus and Greece on the agenda. Cyprus is seeking approval of the first chunk of its bailout program, worth €3bn, while Greece is set to receive €7.5bn in the latest bailout payment. read BBC read comment on Reuters MacroScope

As for the rest of the week, we’ll get all kinds of data from the US, including industrial production and inflation and housing. Same goes for the eurozone and Germany; the UK reports unemployment figures and Japan will give us preliminary Q1 GDP figures.

So long.

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Europe is the new Japan – ECB cuts rates

Yesterday…The Fed’s FOMC meeting notes showed that we’re moving away from the “let’s close the money tap” idea and back to “whatever it takes” – meaning easing or no easing. The statement said that policy action will be taken with an eye on how the economy will progress. read Alphaville (interestingly, Matthew Yglesias of Slate has interpreted this as a call for stimulus)

Apple‘s mega bond of $17m helps the company to avoid $9bn in taxes. If Apple would have had to bring in money from abroad to pay dividends to shareholders, that’s what it would have cost them. Of course, the average Apple customer, like me, doesn’t care about tax avoidance (it’s not even illegal), but the American state is upset, as it’s trying to crack down on offshore tax avoidance like never before this year. read FT

Otherwise, an infographic to yesterday’s ADP employment report. view graphic

This morning…
all eyes are on the ECB, which just announced a benchmark interest rate cut by a quarter point to 0.50%. A press conference during which Mario Draghi will wear a suit made of money is set to follow at 1.30 BST. Let the excitement begin. Money for everyone.

UBS is holding an investor meeting today, during which the bank may be urged to split its investment banking and wealth management units [again]. read Reuters

So long.

Death Star Economics
ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

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Slovenia slides down the bailout slope

Yesterday

The Fed is considering tougher capital requirements over worries that banks could be playing the [Basel III] system. Currently, the international agreement sees equity capital at only 3%. Basel brought that up significantly, but also gave the parties involved more room for… creative accounting. Give a bank a loophole. read FT

Moody’s downgraded Slovenia to junk with negative outlook (ouch), which is unfortunate, because the country was planning to auction off some debt. read FT
And now the pathway to an EU bailout: (read Bloomberg)

Rising loan losses resulting from a housing bust and a second recession in two years have left a hole of about 7.5 billion euros ($9.9 billion) at Slovenia-based lenders, investment bank Keefe Bruyette & Woods estimates. That’s a lot for a 35 billion-euro economy: A bank bailout would push government debt above 70 percent of economic output.

Apple issued $17bn in debt – the largest corporate debt offering ever – in six tranches to return money to shareholders and avoid repatriation taxes on overseas funds. read WSJ

In New York, the Empire State Building was lit up in FT-pink to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the newspaper.

This morning…
is quiet due to Labor Day in vast parts of the world.

Later on, we’ll get some data from the US, including the ADP employment report, ISM manufacturing data and the post-FOMC meeting statement from the Fed (ex Bernanke press conference). The ISM is expected to drop below 50, as it last did in November of last year and several months in 2009.

So long.

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Spain turns to stimuli, as Merkel points to two-tier Europe

Yesterday…
Spain’s unemployment rate rose to a new high of 27.2%, possibly marking the final point that austerity measures haven’t work in this case or simply don’t work at all (hello, Keynesians). Between January and March, almost 240,000 people lost their jobs. read BBC
Following the announcement, Mariano Rajoy announced the government would lay low on cuts and tax hikes, as even though the deficit has shrunk, the country is doing miserable. Stimulus for everyone! read WSJ

The UK dodged the bullet on a triple-drip recession, reporting first quarter GDP growth of 0.3% from the previous quarter

This morning…
Angela Merkel stirred the European debate with remarks about the potential impending rate cut by the ECB. Merkel pointed out that country’s like Germany actually needed a rate increase, while other country’s required further easing, underlining the divide between functional and dysfunctional Europe.

In Italy, coalition building is underway. Prime Minister-to be Enrico Letta said the conservatives would have to work out a compromise regarding the property tax that Berlusconi promised to get rid off before joining the coalition.

Today, the US is announcing first quarter GDP growth, which is expected to come in at 3% from the final quarter of 2012. Over the next three months, this number will be revised three times, once due to the change in government statistics in late July. read WSJ

In Japan, consumer prices have fallen fastest in two years in March, which doesn’t really come as a surprise considering all the excess liquidity in the system. Prices fell 0.5% on the year, slightly more than expected. read Bloomberg

Weekend reading:
Italy’s new heads of state – an evalution, read The Economist
– meet Janet “anti-inflation” Yellen, possibly the next head of the Fed, read NYTimes
– why the city of Los Angeles is suing Deutsche Bank, read Businessweek
real bad boys smuggle dairy, read Bloomberg

Have a good one.

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Cyprus to sell €400m in gold; bailout to total €23bn

Yesterday…
Barack Obama submitted a budget proposal to Congress, totalling $3.77tn and including policies to curb social security and medicare expenses. The proposal foresees a $744bn deficit for 2014. read article

While the minutes from the latest Federal Open Market Committee meeting were expected today, they were accidentally sent out early to lobbyists, Citigroup and Goldman Sachs. Oops. The notes supported the thesis that the Fed’s QE program could end by year-end 2014, given improvements in the job market. read article

This morning…
Over in Cyprus, €400m worth of gold are up for sale, as the country has to up its contributions to the bailout program that so far consists of €9bn from European institutions and €1bn from the IMF. Another €10.9bn will free up in the winding down of Laiki Bank. And yes, all that money, €23bn, will be needed to just keep the country afloat until the beginning of 2016. read article

China has seen a massive influx of foreign capital. In Q1 of this year, the country’s forex reserves exploded to $3.44tn from only $130bn in the previous quarter. New financing grew by 58% from the same period last year. read article

Next door in Japan, central bank governor Kuroda said the BoJ had done all it could at this point, and the asset purchasing program wouldn’t be expanded any further any time soon. read article

So long.

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A new benchmark fixing scandal!!

Yesterday…

former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher died of a stroke at the age of 87. Despite her polarizing character, there seems to be a consensus of her importance to the role of the UK on the global stage, both economically and politically. Finally, she also remains Britain’s only female PM. Most used terms: ‘liberalization’, ‘relentless’, ‘unforgiving’, ‘open markets’. read article

In the US, we see the beginning of a new benchmark fixing scandal: interdealer broker ICAP and some unnamed banks have been subpoenaed by the CFTC yesterday for potentially fixing the interest rate swap benchmark ISDAFIX. read article

Asset manager BlackRock has hit back at the Fed’s QE program, saying it distorted the markets. This is quite a change in BlackRock’s stance, as the company was all over government debt before until it started to nudge investors into less interest rate-sensitive products. read article

Following the court ruling that restricted Portugal‘s austerity measures last week, the country could see delays for future funds and no revision of the repayment schedule. According to the FT:

The court ruling means Lisbon will not receive the next €2bn installment of its €78bn bailout until it has convinced international lenders that fresh cuts in spending on health, education and social security will be sufficient to compensate for the rejected measures.

This morning…

we got CPI data from China, showing lower inflation at 2.1%, with food price inflation down from 6% in February (i.e. the Lunar New Year is a ripoff) to 2.7%.

In the UK factory output rose by 0.8% in February, more than the median estimate of 0.4% as according to Bloomberg, while German exports slumped in February, just to see imports decline by more than double the rate at -3.8%. read article

So long.

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Portugal is this week’s Cyprus

Over the weekend…the collective attention was brought back to Portugal, where the country’s highest court ruled that spending cuts in public sector salaries as well as state pensions were unconstitutional. Sounds like a bit like something Greece would do. Needless to say those cuts weren’t just for fun and games, but indeed to keep Portugal out of the EU’s dog house and on track for its €78bn bailout package.

Luxembourg‘s Finance Minister Luc Frieden said that the country would stop opposing the sharing of banking data within the EU, going along with the trend of increasing transparency in [former?] tax havens. read article

This morning…
there is the weakening JPY reacting to Tokyo’s new harder better faster stronger QE measures that will increase monthly asset purchases to JPY7.5tn. In fact, then yen hasn’t been this weak since May 2009. read article

While Japan’s 2% inflation target until 2015 seems a bit fishy to some [most recently China], following the above, Christine Lagarde of the IMF is a big fan. According to her, it will improve global demand, and the inertial upswing in the US economy was proof enough of that. read article

As for the rest of the week, the Fed’s Open Market Committee is meeting on Wednesday, continuing the discussion regarding when and how America’s money tap can be turned off. Otherwise, there will be industrial and trade data from China and various European countries, as well as a review of bailout programs in Portugal and Ireland. in other words, Portugal is this week’s Cyprus.

Have a good week.

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IMF joins Cyprus creditors; Fannie Mae records first profits in 6 years

There won’t be an update tomorrow, Thursday April 4th.

Yesterday…In the US, people are getting more nervous about the Fed’s spending spree. Eyeing over to Japan, that might be fair. Once again, it’s Jeffrey Lacker, President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, who doesn’t beat around the bush when it comes to disliking monetary policy. read article

Fannie Mae, which received a total of $116.1bn in bailout finance from the US Treasury since the financial crisis, officially returned back to black. For the financial year 2012, the mortgage business recorded $17.2bn in profit. Finally. Although things are looking up, $84.7bn of its bailout package remain outstanding. read article

Speaking of earnings, the SEC has given companies the okay to announce earnings and other news via Facebook and Twitter, throwing off all those institutions (read banks) that blocked social networking sites for their employees. read article

Cyprus’ Minister of Finance resigned, saying he had done his deed in negotiating the bailout deal. In related news, the IMF stated today that it will pay €1bn of the total €10bn bailout package for Cyrpus, spread out over three years.

This morning…
there’s little to talk about. By 9.45am the most striking news were that Apple may release two new phones this year, and even that was a story from yesterday. read article

Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy is looking towards Brussels to get the growth in Europe going (good luck with that) and stop the austerity vise (even more luck for that), asking for countries in the position to do so to spend more to stimulate the economy. read article

So long.

Death Star Economics
ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

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