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Jeffrey Osborne has left the building

This week…

Was mostly about Ben Bernanke and the path of macro conditions he chose for the coming month. So QE could be gone for good sometime next year, given supporting data, that we are now waiting for under sweat and tears. read Alphaville

In fact, Bernanke himself could be gone as well, as Obama indicated that the chairman could retire in the near future. read Financial Times

Economists polled by Bloomberg now suggest that the cutting will begin in September, to be finished by June 2014. A tight schedule considering when the rumors started. read Bloomberg

And if that’s not enough for you, there is always China and the fear of worse days ahead, pointing towards a credit squeeze. In short (by WSJ):

Early Friday, rates in China’s money markets fell sharply on rumors that Beijing had ordered its big banks to loosen up cash. Still, they remain more than double than average for the year, and the turbulence suggest continued uncertainty in the market in coming days.

Probably equally noteworthy was the G8 meeting in Northern Ireland, the possibly biggest take-away from which was that Barack Obama kept referring to George Osborne as “Jeffrey Osborne“. read Financial Times

Jeffrey Osborne himself, an American soul singer, proceeded to offer George a duet, which was turned down because the Chancellor neither laughs nor sings. read BBC

In Turkey, things are getting interesting for bankers, Erdogan‘s new found enemy. According to the prime minister, the recent crisis was due to the “interest-rates lobby” trying to push yields up. To put this in perspective, the words “blood-sucking” were used, although government officials refrained from sea food comparisons. read Bloomberg

Next week…

The US brings us June consumer confidence data (Tuesday), which is expected to have dropped from May, while consumer spending (Thursday) is meant to have increased slightly; the latest first quarter GDP reading will come in on Wednesday and is expected flat at 2.4%. Jobless claims are published on Thursday morning.

There is whole array of business climate and consumer confidence indicators as well as inflation data due in Europe, including Germany, France, Italy and the eurozone as such are, while the UK is also reporting first quarter GDP growth and the current account deficit.

Japan is due to report on unemployment and indeflation. On Wednesday, Japan reported higher May exports than expected, export value increased the most since 2010, indicating that Abenomics are working. And you say currency wars do no good. On that note, read Bloomberg

Have a good one.

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An attempt at revival

This week…

Things in Turkey continued to be messy, as Erdogan’s stern view of protesters continues to spark new anger among the masses and sent the Turkish Lira falling. read Bloomberg
On Thursday, Erdogan re-iterated that he was losing patience with the protestors. Today, the government and its counter movement reached an agreement, while Germany delayed further EU accession talks with Turkey. read WSJ

In Greece, the doors of Hellenic Broadcasting Corp closed, sending 2,500 former employees out onto the streets. It is meant to be relaunched later this year in a slimmed-down version. read WSJ

In the UK, jobless claims dropped, suggesting that the recovery is well on its way (remember how we’ve been here roughly 700 hundred times now..?). read Bloomberg

And then there was Wednesday, when literally everyone with an audience called the bond bubble, for example Jim O’Neill (formerly of Goldman Sachs) and Bill Gross (Pimco)

Around the same time, Iraqi officials said the country was looking to increase its oil production by 29% in 2014 and 159% by 2020, showing that a) they can and b) they have buyers. read Emerging Frontiers

Then there was a new price fixing scandal [yes, there are still some products left]; this time in FX. read Felix Salmon

Meanwhile on Wall Street, notes on correlations with Japan: read WSJ

In Brussels, important issues like the size and curviture of bananas and cucumbers has been pushed aside as Washington’s lobbyists walked in to ensure EU privacy regulations wouldn’t get so strict that they could hurt US investigations overseas. read FT

Rupert Murdoch is divorcing Wendy Deng, could this be the actual reason for splitting News Corp? read New Yorker

The week ahead…

The G8 meet on the outskirts of London on Monday and Tuesday; anti-globalization protesters will ironically stick to central London, where they will follow a scavenger hunt-like course through the West end, mapped out here. Please refrain from buying condiments at Fortnum & Mason until the weekend, as you may otherwise be questioned about the social legitimacy of your job.

Otherwise, it’s going to be a Bernanke-dominated week – again – as the Fed is meeting and press conferencing. Although Bernanke tried to nullify the comments about an end of easing, saying that it would take “considerable” time until that would happen, everybody seems to think the US is going to turn the money tap off. read WSJ

Have a good one.

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Harry Potter was a trader too

So, we all remember the ‘great vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity‘, right? Not only was it hilarious, it also came in handy at a time when society needed to pin a face, or a firm, to the root of all evil. But really, that’s very 2010. There’s a new villan in town, London-town that is: Voldemort, formally known as the White Whale. JP Morgan trader Bruno Iskil (seriously, his name is Bruno, how did we have to go all the way to Harry Potter jokes?) earned his nickname by throwing the ridiculous amount of $100bn around and is the new center of attention. That is mostly Paul Volcker’s attention, because distorting the market like that might be illegal and a handful of hedge funds had complained. Clearly, JP Morgan disagrees.

Bloomberg put the story out there; here is Alphaville’s bashing of the coverage thus far.

Otherwise, there is a G8 meeting concerning, among other things, Syria and nuclear energy in Washington today. The two people who seem to have the biggest stake in the outcome of the summit: Bono and Bob Geldorf. Who else… read article

That leaves room for the rest of the world to worry about Spain.

WSJ:

If Spain and Italy spiral out of control, Greece will be to Spain and Italy, what Bear Stearns was to Lehman.

Who are we kidding, there’s a shit-storm ahead.

The Economist has done a profile of Mariano Rajoy after 100 days in office, including the deepest budget cuts since Franco and losing the upper hand in Spain’s largest electorate Andalusia. read article

The weird recession-car-purchase behavior continues, and while countries are tumbling, BMW logged the highest monthly sales ever in March, selling 185,728 cars. read article

Also, goodbye, Rick Santorum. It was fun while it lasted – for us – though this might not have been the last we hear from him… read article

So long.

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