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Jeffrey Osborne has left the building

This week…

Was mostly about Ben Bernanke and the path of macro conditions he chose for the coming month. So QE could be gone for good sometime next year, given supporting data, that we are now waiting for under sweat and tears. read Alphaville

In fact, Bernanke himself could be gone as well, as Obama indicated that the chairman could retire in the near future. read Financial Times

Economists polled by Bloomberg now suggest that the cutting will begin in September, to be finished by June 2014. A tight schedule considering when the rumors started. read Bloomberg

And if that’s not enough for you, there is always China and the fear of worse days ahead, pointing towards a credit squeeze. In short (by WSJ):

Early Friday, rates in China’s money markets fell sharply on rumors that Beijing had ordered its big banks to loosen up cash. Still, they remain more than double than average for the year, and the turbulence suggest continued uncertainty in the market in coming days.

Probably equally noteworthy was the G8 meeting in Northern Ireland, the possibly biggest take-away from which was that Barack Obama kept referring to George Osborne as “Jeffrey Osborne“. read Financial Times

Jeffrey Osborne himself, an American soul singer, proceeded to offer George a duet, which was turned down because the Chancellor neither laughs nor sings. read BBC

In Turkey, things are getting interesting for bankers, Erdogan‘s new found enemy. According to the prime minister, the recent crisis was due to the “interest-rates lobby” trying to push yields up. To put this in perspective, the words “blood-sucking” were used, although government officials refrained from sea food comparisons. read Bloomberg

Next week…

The US brings us June consumer confidence data (Tuesday), which is expected to have dropped from May, while consumer spending (Thursday) is meant to have increased slightly; the latest first quarter GDP reading will come in on Wednesday and is expected flat at 2.4%. Jobless claims are published on Thursday morning.

There is whole array of business climate and consumer confidence indicators as well as inflation data due in Europe, including Germany, France, Italy and the eurozone as such are, while the UK is also reporting first quarter GDP growth and the current account deficit.

Japan is due to report on unemployment and indeflation. On Wednesday, Japan reported higher May exports than expected, export value increased the most since 2010, indicating that Abenomics are working. And you say currency wars do no good. On that note, read Bloomberg

Have a good one.

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Eurozone recession here to stay, UK gets ready for exit

Yesterday…
David Cameron and his comrades of the Conservative Party published a policy draft for a referendum for a possible EU-exit of the UK. The draft says the referendum has to be completed by December 2017, given the Tories win the 2015 elections. I think the campaigning just began. read BBC

While the global “recovery” continues to force deficits to skyrocket and imports to slump, India has managed to become the outlier in the trend on Monday afternoon. Taking advantage of the low gold price, imports rose 138% since April 2012 to $7.5bn, or 18% of all imports, while the trade deficit hit 17.8bn. read Zerohedge

And of course the drama over Bloomberg‘s use of user data continued… read FT Alphaville

This morning…
there was a flood of data, with the German economy growing 0.1% from 4Q12 to the first quarter of 2013, undercutting the depressing estimate of 0.3% growth. The French economy contracted by 0.2% over the same period of time. read Bloomberg
Franco-German relations haven’t been great since Hollande got into office, but this morning’s result may just worsen the atmosphere of any policy discussion. The eurozone as such, contracted 0.2% in 1Q13. The recession continues…

Simultaneously, Mervyn “it’s-almost-his-last-day” King of the Bank of England raised the outlook for the UK economy [with lower inflation] and raised his eyebrows at eurozone performance, as well as the continental Financial Transaction Tax. read Guardian

Meanwhile, the US is preparing to become the model student again. The Congressional Budget Office is forecasting the deficit to fall as far as $378bn by 2015, much faster than anticipated. The 2013 forecast was cut by $203bn to an overall $642bn. read Reuters
And that is not all: Formerly the largest corporate debt market in the world, providing ample opportunity for the Michael Milken followers of the world to make money, China is going to take that spot within the next two years, according to S&P. Soon America will be debt and deficit free and flow with milk and vodka (we’re all grown-ups here). read Financial Times

In the kerfuffle over whether Jamie Dimon is allowed to stay in in his double-role as chairman and CEO of JPMorgan seems to be blowing over (much like Lloyd Blankfein expected), as fewer shareholders than expected are looking to back the leadership reform. Another bullet dodged for the industry. read Financial Times

And in case you’ve been in a good mood this morning, have a look at this: 10 Scenes from the ongoing global economic collapse (Zerohedge)

So long.

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US budget deficit decreases; ECB rate cut likely

Yesterday…
The IMF warned of the Asian bubble, saying too much FDI was leading to explosive credit growth and property prices, and it was to get even worse if Japan’s monetary policy was to have the intended effect on the Japanese economy (hold your horses, Christine). read FT

Deutsche Bank is issuing €2.8bn of new stock to improve its capital base. According to WSJ, Deutsche Bank has one of the lowest capital ratios among European banks. read WSJ

This morning…
The Dutch Queen Beatrix abdicated, to be replaced by her son Willem-Alexander. She will be demoted to Princess Beatrix. read BBC

The US Treasury is expecting the first lowering of the budget deficit since 2007 between April and June 2013, when it is looking to repay $35bn, against the February estimate of shouldering another $103bn in debt. The deficit cut is due to tax increases, spending cuts and tax revenues recoveries. read FT

There was a whole flood of data out of Europe this morning: both Eurozone and German inflation came in at 1.2%, lower than expected, making a rate cut by the ECB on Thursday more likely. German unemployment added to its rise in March, but the adjusted rate is still only marginally above the two-decade low of 6.8%. Eurozone unemployment climbed to 12.1%. No surprise there, when has it not been rising… read Alphaville

Spain reported GDP growth for the first quarter – keyword ‘growth’ – at -0.5%, leading the Bank of Spain to lower it 2013 growth expectations from -0.5% to -1.3%. read CNBC

So long.

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Spain turns to stimuli, as Merkel points to two-tier Europe

Yesterday…
Spain’s unemployment rate rose to a new high of 27.2%, possibly marking the final point that austerity measures haven’t work in this case or simply don’t work at all (hello, Keynesians). Between January and March, almost 240,000 people lost their jobs. read BBC
Following the announcement, Mariano Rajoy announced the government would lay low on cuts and tax hikes, as even though the deficit has shrunk, the country is doing miserable. Stimulus for everyone! read WSJ

The UK dodged the bullet on a triple-drip recession, reporting first quarter GDP growth of 0.3% from the previous quarter

This morning…
Angela Merkel stirred the European debate with remarks about the potential impending rate cut by the ECB. Merkel pointed out that country’s like Germany actually needed a rate increase, while other country’s required further easing, underlining the divide between functional and dysfunctional Europe.

In Italy, coalition building is underway. Prime Minister-to be Enrico Letta said the conservatives would have to work out a compromise regarding the property tax that Berlusconi promised to get rid off before joining the coalition.

Today, the US is announcing first quarter GDP growth, which is expected to come in at 3% from the final quarter of 2012. Over the next three months, this number will be revised three times, once due to the change in government statistics in late July. read WSJ

In Japan, consumer prices have fallen fastest in two years in March, which doesn’t really come as a surprise considering all the excess liquidity in the system. Prices fell 0.5% on the year, slightly more than expected. read Bloomberg

Weekend reading:
Italy’s new heads of state – an evalution, read The Economist
– meet Janet “anti-inflation” Yellen, possibly the next head of the Fed, read NYTimes
– why the city of Los Angeles is suing Deutsche Bank, read Businessweek
real bad boys smuggle dairy, read Bloomberg

Have a good one.

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All according to plan – US set to grow 3%; China’s slowdown on purpose

Over the weekend…
the UK lost its Fitch-assigned AAA rating on the back of the weak economy and poor outlook. Moody’s downgraded the country in February, but also assigned a negative outlook, while Fitch is optimistic that the UK will return to credit-worthy prosperity around 2014/2015. read article

In Italy, Giorgio Napolitano was re-elected President for the coming seven years on Saturday. The independent is expected to propose a bipartisan cabinet, considering that he was elected by both sides of the political spectrum to avoid another round of elections. Everybody except for Beppe Grillo seems happy; he had called Napolitano’s re-election a coup d’etat. read article

The G20 meeting ended with everyone promising to not engage in competitive devaluation of currencies, defending Japan’s monetary policy as appropriate and targeting domestic demand. read article

This morning…
word got out that the US will see 3% growth in July, due to a reform of the methodology behind government statistics. 21st century GDP also takes film royalties and R&D spending into account:

Billions of dollars of intangible assets will enter the gross domestic product of the world’s largest economy in a revision aimed at capturing the changing nature of US output.” read article

Meanwhile in China, central bank Governor Zhou Xiaochuan justified the country’s below-expectations growth rate of 7.7% in the first quarter of 2013, saying slow growth was necessary as structural reforms are being put into place. read article

Otherwise the counter-austerity voices are getting louder again, this time it’s Pimco’s Bill Gross (not that surprising) and Jose Manuel Barroso of all people, the President of the European Commission. Could this be the beginning of the end of Angela Austerity Merkel’s dominance in European policy? Probably not.

So long.

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China slows, Greece set to grow again

Over the weekend…
Venezuela has elected a new President, after re-elected Hugo Chavez died in early March after long illness. Nicolas Maduro is the man Chavez singled out as a worthy candidate himself, and the election result may have been driven my emotions more so than politics. read article

This morning…
China reported Q1 GDP growth, which came in lower than expected. Year-on-year, the country’s economy grew at a rate of 7.7% in the first three months of 2013. Prior estimates had suggested 8%; Q4 2012 came in at 7.9%. Again, we are facing a week of panic over the Chinese slowdown. read article

Otherwise, troika officials are arriving in Portugal today to assess the country’s austerity plans and post-bailout progress. Simultaneously, the body, composed of the EU, the ECB and the IMF, released a report claiming that Greece could return to growth next year. read article

The week ahead…
will bring us the first batch of earnings from New York-listed corporates, including a bunch of banks like Citigroup, Bank of America and Goldman Sachs, and tech companies Google, Microsoft and IBM.

The Italian parliament will try to elect a new President in the coming days. Officially, the process to find Giorgio Napolitano’s successor begins on Thursday, but it is expected to last a couple of days.

So long.

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Laiki depositors to lose up to 80%, Poland turns against euro

Yesterday…The Spanish central bank forecasts its economy to contract by 1.5% in 2013, while unemployment is seen to rise to close to 30%:

The economy will be marked by weak domestic demand, a fragile labor market and tight financial conditions, the bank said.” read article

Meanwhile in Poland, Prime Minister Donald Tusk is floating the idea of a euro referendum. The country has been pushing to join the foreign currency pretty much as long as it has existed – proximity to Germany would bring an additional trade advantage (despite the disadvantage for cheap manual labor). Anyway, now Poland is not so sure anymore. The political opposition claims the eurozone has changed too much since 2004, when the country joined, for a decisions to possibly still be valid. read article

The US economy must be improving, because it’s not getting worse. That was the idea of the morale following the data announcement of January home prices rising at the fastest rate since summer 2006 and an increasing demand for durable goods. read article

In other news, the Financial Times has found that the group of AAA-rated countries has decreased by 60% since 2007, and Warren Buffet will become one of Goldman Sachs’ ten biggest investors after exercising some warrants issued in 2008. read article

This morning…
Cyprus‘ central bank announced some details on the impending haircuts, saying uninsured deposits at Cyprus Popular Bank (Laiki) could be cut by 4/5th. The estimated 40% haircut seems to remain the benchmark for larger insured deposits. According to WSJ:

Based on estiamtes from government officials, the losses would affect some 19,000 deposit-holders at the Bank of Cyprus who, combined, hold some €8.01 billion in uninsured deposits. Uninsured savers at Cyprus Popular Bank, who hold a combined €3.2 billion, will lose most of that.

The Bank of England said British banks were facing a £25bn capital shortfall with regards to compliance with new banking standards. read article

So long.

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China curbs growth targets in light of social issues

There won’t be an update tomorrow, Wednesday March 6th.

News from China, where outgoing Prime Minister Wen Jiabao presented the country’s economic targets for 2013, including an unchanged GDP target of 7.5%, a lowered inflation target of 3.5% (down from 4%) and a budget deficit of RMB1.2tn, or 2% of GDPDefense spending will be boosted by 10.7%, a smaller increase than in any year since 1990. But the departing Premier also said that China’s growth model was unsustainable and on top of that paired with a whole array of social issues, like the income gap, increasing pollution and a real estate bubbleread article

Also in China, the SEC has been allowed to subpoena Deloitte’s China unit over accounting fraud at Chinese companies operating in the US. After initial co-operation between the American and Chinese securities regulators failed, this is a big step in terms of cross-border fraud investigations. read article

In other regulatory news, an undisclosed group of banks in the City of London have received a hat tip from law firm Shearman & Sterling that it was possible to fight the EU’s banker bonus cap [proposal] in courtread article 

Until then, enter George Osborne.

Otherwise, Apple’s stock fell to a new 52-week low yesterday, dragging the company’s market cap down below $400bn for the first time in over a year. 

So long.

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Budget cuts and peripheral misery

Today at midnight (Saturday morning in the old world), the US is facing the much discussed spending cuts, decreasing government spending by €85bn until the end of the federal budget year in September. Maybe it’s time to depart from discussing the sheer possibility of this scenario. If you believe Bernankethe pain will be close to intolerable, slowing the economy down by 1.5%. The Congressional Budget Office estimates a 0.6% decrease in GDP. If you believe Fortunecompany earnings are strong enough to allow ignoring the issue. Without a budget fix, the automatic cuts will continue in the following financial year. read article

And things aren’t pretty in Europe’s periphery either. First, numbers out of Spain showed that Spanish corporations faced the largest decrease in earnings ever recorded in Q4, including Bankia’s €19.2bn net loss. Meanwhile in ItalyBersani rejected all rumors regarding coalition talks with Berlusconi. Over in Greece, 2012 revenue targets were missed and the burden of unpaid taxes increased, causing skepticism in Brussels, where the next loan instalment, worth €2.8bn, can be withheld if Greece’ financial report is not satisfactory. At the same time, the IMF, usually in bed with the EU, was more positive, saying Greece had collected more taxes recently and could avoid a further reduction in government salaries.

We shouldn’t forget, however, that despite the mess that is Southern Europe (oh yes, I made that generalization), there are still countries out there that want to join the union and currency. Poland, for example, which originally wanted to have the euro by 2012, is now discussing meeting all criteria (the same criteria that Greece met once…) by 2015read article

In India, Q4 GDP growth dropped to 4.5%, as the government announced a more pro-business deficit-reducing budget for the coming year. read article

Otherwise, Andrew Mason removed from his position as CEO of discount firm Groupon, which recorded losses in the last two quarters of 2012. In his own words:

After four and a half intense and wonderful years as C.E.O. of Groupon, I’ve decided that I’d like to spend more time with my family. Just kidding – I was fired today. If you’re wondering why… you haven’t been paying attention.

Weekend reading

– The “Because I Can” attitude of senior managementread article

– Dear Banker, this is how we’ll pay you in the futureread article 1 read article 2

– the European Union and Ricardian equivalenceread article

Have a good one.

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The sequester is back, as is Europe’s political madness

In the US, the chaos that is the national budget and the cuts thereof is picking up in newsworthiness again. Yesterday, President Obama tried to guilt Republicans into agreeing with his proposal, which didn’t achieve all that much. New estimates say the sequester could chop 0.5% off this year’s GDP and destroy 700,000 jobs. Others say that besides the overall effect, the demand side won’t feel the $85bn spending cuts. read article

Something that won’t suffer cuts is medical research, generally a positive thing, with the billion dollar research project Brain Activity Map (BAM), the first neurological project of its kind, starting in a couple of weeks. read article

As of today, Bulgaria is without government, after the country protested against austerity measures, utility prices and corruption. In next steps, a caretaker government will be formed, before official elections sometime in Springread article

In other European news, Italy’s center-left Democrats are trying to build a coalition government with Mario Monti to fight the good fight against Berlusconi, while Mariano Rajoy of Spain said the Spanish economy was seeing “no green shots or recovery in any shape or form.

Also from Spain, the government is imposing a yield limit on regional government bonds to combat the country’s overall debt burden. The new limit will be set at 100 basis point above government debt, a benchmark that Catalonia has long passed. read article

In other news, Microsoft has abandoned Hotmail, phasing out the emailing service by this summer. All 350 million users (seriously, who still uses Hotmail??) will be moved to Outlook.com, which already has 60 million users of its own. read article

So long.

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