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ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

Eurozone recession here to stay, UK gets ready for exit

Yesterday…
David Cameron and his comrades of the Conservative Party published a policy draft for a referendum for a possible EU-exit of the UK. The draft says the referendum has to be completed by December 2017, given the Tories win the 2015 elections. I think the campaigning just began. read BBC

While the global “recovery” continues to force deficits to skyrocket and imports to slump, India has managed to become the outlier in the trend on Monday afternoon. Taking advantage of the low gold price, imports rose 138% since April 2012 to $7.5bn, or 18% of all imports, while the trade deficit hit 17.8bn. read Zerohedge

And of course the drama over Bloomberg‘s use of user data continued… read FT Alphaville

This morning…
there was a flood of data, with the German economy growing 0.1% from 4Q12 to the first quarter of 2013, undercutting the depressing estimate of 0.3% growth. The French economy contracted by 0.2% over the same period of time. read Bloomberg
Franco-German relations haven’t been great since Hollande got into office, but this morning’s result may just worsen the atmosphere of any policy discussion. The eurozone as such, contracted 0.2% in 1Q13. The recession continues…

Simultaneously, Mervyn “it’s-almost-his-last-day” King of the Bank of England raised the outlook for the UK economy [with lower inflation] and raised his eyebrows at eurozone performance, as well as the continental Financial Transaction Tax. read Guardian

Meanwhile, the US is preparing to become the model student again. The Congressional Budget Office is forecasting the deficit to fall as far as $378bn by 2015, much faster than anticipated. The 2013 forecast was cut by $203bn to an overall $642bn. read Reuters
And that is not all: Formerly the largest corporate debt market in the world, providing ample opportunity for the Michael Milken followers of the world to make money, China is going to take that spot within the next two years, according to S&P. Soon America will be debt and deficit free and flow with milk and vodka (we’re all grown-ups here). read Financial Times

In the kerfuffle over whether Jamie Dimon is allowed to stay in in his double-role as chairman and CEO of JPMorgan seems to be blowing over (much like Lloyd Blankfein expected), as fewer shareholders than expected are looking to back the leadership reform. Another bullet dodged for the industry. read Financial Times

And in case you’ve been in a good mood this morning, have a look at this: 10 Scenes from the ongoing global economic collapse (Zerohedge)

So long.

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Spain turns to stimuli, as Merkel points to two-tier Europe

Yesterday…
Spain’s unemployment rate rose to a new high of 27.2%, possibly marking the final point that austerity measures haven’t work in this case or simply don’t work at all (hello, Keynesians). Between January and March, almost 240,000 people lost their jobs. read BBC
Following the announcement, Mariano Rajoy announced the government would lay low on cuts and tax hikes, as even though the deficit has shrunk, the country is doing miserable. Stimulus for everyone! read WSJ

The UK dodged the bullet on a triple-drip recession, reporting first quarter GDP growth of 0.3% from the previous quarter

This morning…
Angela Merkel stirred the European debate with remarks about the potential impending rate cut by the ECB. Merkel pointed out that country’s like Germany actually needed a rate increase, while other country’s required further easing, underlining the divide between functional and dysfunctional Europe.

In Italy, coalition building is underway. Prime Minister-to be Enrico Letta said the conservatives would have to work out a compromise regarding the property tax that Berlusconi promised to get rid off before joining the coalition.

Today, the US is announcing first quarter GDP growth, which is expected to come in at 3% from the final quarter of 2012. Over the next three months, this number will be revised three times, once due to the change in government statistics in late July. read WSJ

In Japan, consumer prices have fallen fastest in two years in March, which doesn’t really come as a surprise considering all the excess liquidity in the system. Prices fell 0.5% on the year, slightly more than expected. read Bloomberg

Weekend reading:
Italy’s new heads of state – an evalution, read The Economist
– meet Janet “anti-inflation” Yellen, possibly the next head of the Fed, read NYTimes
– why the city of Los Angeles is suing Deutsche Bank, read Businessweek
real bad boys smuggle dairy, read Bloomberg

Have a good one.

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Letta new Italian PM; Apple profits drop for first time in decade

Yesterday…
It was a dark day for the European economy, with April PMIs across the globe disappointed, except for France, which beat expectations and soared to four-months highs. China and Germany on the other hand, undercut expectations – Germany even fell below the magic mark of 50, to 48.8, the lowest level in six months. read Bloomberg

After all the united G20 talk of appropriate monetary measures, S&P said that there’s a 30+% chance that Japan will lose its AA rating. The reasoning: it’s great to have quantitative easing, stimuli and private sector involvement, but that strategy doesn’t work if all you do is print money. read Reuters

Meanwhile in Portugal, the government is planning to lower corporate taxes to attract business. Good timing. read WSJ

Right after close, the Twitter account of the Associated Press was hacked, posting a tweet about attacks on the White House. The Syrian Electronic Army claimed responsibility. read Alphaville read BBC

Otherwise, it was all about Apple. The tech giant posted first quarter earnings,showing that profits dropped for the first time in a decade in year-on-year comparison. Alongside quarterly results, the company also announced an expansion to its now $100bn share buyback program to return money to investors. read WSJ

This morning…
Italy is set to announce a new Prime Minister. The current candidates are Guiliano Amato (Prime Minister 1992-1993 and 200-2001), Matteo Renzi (Mayor of Florance) and Enrico Letta (center-left deputy leader), all of which are less crazy than Berlusconi and none of which have worked for Goldman Sachs. read Reuters
BREAKING: Enrico Letta set to become Italy’s new prime minister

In anticipation on next week’s ECB meeting, rumor has it the Mario Draghi is likely to cut another quarter of a point off current interest rates, as inflation rates are below target and the eurozone finds itself back in recession. read Reuters

So long.

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All according to plan – US set to grow 3%; China’s slowdown on purpose

Over the weekend…
the UK lost its Fitch-assigned AAA rating on the back of the weak economy and poor outlook. Moody’s downgraded the country in February, but also assigned a negative outlook, while Fitch is optimistic that the UK will return to credit-worthy prosperity around 2014/2015. read article

In Italy, Giorgio Napolitano was re-elected President for the coming seven years on Saturday. The independent is expected to propose a bipartisan cabinet, considering that he was elected by both sides of the political spectrum to avoid another round of elections. Everybody except for Beppe Grillo seems happy; he had called Napolitano’s re-election a coup d’etat. read article

The G20 meeting ended with everyone promising to not engage in competitive devaluation of currencies, defending Japan’s monetary policy as appropriate and targeting domestic demand. read article

This morning…
word got out that the US will see 3% growth in July, due to a reform of the methodology behind government statistics. 21st century GDP also takes film royalties and R&D spending into account:

Billions of dollars of intangible assets will enter the gross domestic product of the world’s largest economy in a revision aimed at capturing the changing nature of US output.” read article

Meanwhile in China, central bank Governor Zhou Xiaochuan justified the country’s below-expectations growth rate of 7.7% in the first quarter of 2013, saying slow growth was necessary as structural reforms are being put into place. read article

Otherwise the counter-austerity voices are getting louder again, this time it’s Pimco’s Bill Gross (not that surprising) and Jose Manuel Barroso of all people, the President of the European Commission. Could this be the beginning of the end of Angela Austerity Merkel’s dominance in European policy? Probably not.

So long.

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The things about guaranteed debt – China edition

There won’t be an update until Monday, 22 April 2013.

Yesterday…
the aftershock of the events in Boston continued to dominate the front pages, with President Obama speaking to the nation in the early afternoon, saying the FBI was investigating the explosions as an “act of terror”. read article

The IMF cut its global growth forecast for 2013 again from 3.5% to 3.3% in its World Economic Outlook, which left the 2014 forecast at 4%. Last week, Managing Director Christine Lagarde‘s argued that a three-speed [economic] world was developing, in which some countries are still very far away from recovering. Lagarde also embraced the quantitative easing approach and argued that Japan was moving into the right direction. read article

It’s things like this that could make for an uncomfortable atmosphere at this week’s G20 meeting in Washington, especially with regards to Japan. read article

This morning…
London is dressed in metal barricades as Margaret Thatcher’s funeral is putting more or less everything on hold until the afternoon.

In China, the poultry sector has recorded losses of CNY 10bn ($1.6bn) since the outbreak of bird flu virus H7N9. So far 77 people have been diagnosed as infected; 16 people died. read article

Also in China, a local auditor has said that regional government debt was OOT and it was only a matter of time until a bigger-than-American-housing crash if things were to continue. Here just a taste of how we got here:

Local governments are prohibited from directly raising debt, so they have used special purpose vehicles to circumvent these rules, issuing bonds under the vehicles’ names to fund infrastructure projects.

and

Bonds issued by government-owned investment companies almost always receive top-tier credit ratings from domestic agencies because they are seen as being guaranteed by the provinces and cities that back them.

Right, because that has never been a problem before… Last week, Fitch cut China’s credit rating on the back of “underlying structural weaknesses.” further reading

So long.

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China slows, Greece set to grow again

Over the weekend…
Venezuela has elected a new President, after re-elected Hugo Chavez died in early March after long illness. Nicolas Maduro is the man Chavez singled out as a worthy candidate himself, and the election result may have been driven my emotions more so than politics. read article

This morning…
China reported Q1 GDP growth, which came in lower than expected. Year-on-year, the country’s economy grew at a rate of 7.7% in the first three months of 2013. Prior estimates had suggested 8%; Q4 2012 came in at 7.9%. Again, we are facing a week of panic over the Chinese slowdown. read article

Otherwise, troika officials are arriving in Portugal today to assess the country’s austerity plans and post-bailout progress. Simultaneously, the body, composed of the EU, the ECB and the IMF, released a report claiming that Greece could return to growth next year. read article

The week ahead…
will bring us the first batch of earnings from New York-listed corporates, including a bunch of banks like Citigroup, Bank of America and Goldman Sachs, and tech companies Google, Microsoft and IBM.

The Italian parliament will try to elect a new President in the coming days. Officially, the process to find Giorgio Napolitano’s successor begins on Thursday, but it is expected to last a couple of days.

So long.

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IMF joins Cyprus creditors; Fannie Mae records first profits in 6 years

There won’t be an update tomorrow, Thursday April 4th.

Yesterday…In the US, people are getting more nervous about the Fed’s spending spree. Eyeing over to Japan, that might be fair. Once again, it’s Jeffrey Lacker, President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, who doesn’t beat around the bush when it comes to disliking monetary policy. read article

Fannie Mae, which received a total of $116.1bn in bailout finance from the US Treasury since the financial crisis, officially returned back to black. For the financial year 2012, the mortgage business recorded $17.2bn in profit. Finally. Although things are looking up, $84.7bn of its bailout package remain outstanding. read article

Speaking of earnings, the SEC has given companies the okay to announce earnings and other news via Facebook and Twitter, throwing off all those institutions (read banks) that blocked social networking sites for their employees. read article

Cyprus’ Minister of Finance resigned, saying he had done his deed in negotiating the bailout deal. In related news, the IMF stated today that it will pay €1bn of the total €10bn bailout package for Cyrpus, spread out over three years.

This morning…
there’s little to talk about. By 9.45am the most striking news were that Apple may release two new phones this year, and even that was a story from yesterday. read article

Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy is looking towards Brussels to get the growth in Europe going (good luck with that) and stop the austerity vise (even more luck for that), asking for countries in the position to do so to spend more to stimulate the economy. read article

So long.

Death Star Economics
ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

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Laiki depositors to lose up to 80%, Poland turns against euro

Yesterday…The Spanish central bank forecasts its economy to contract by 1.5% in 2013, while unemployment is seen to rise to close to 30%:

The economy will be marked by weak domestic demand, a fragile labor market and tight financial conditions, the bank said.” read article

Meanwhile in Poland, Prime Minister Donald Tusk is floating the idea of a euro referendum. The country has been pushing to join the foreign currency pretty much as long as it has existed – proximity to Germany would bring an additional trade advantage (despite the disadvantage for cheap manual labor). Anyway, now Poland is not so sure anymore. The political opposition claims the eurozone has changed too much since 2004, when the country joined, for a decisions to possibly still be valid. read article

The US economy must be improving, because it’s not getting worse. That was the idea of the morale following the data announcement of January home prices rising at the fastest rate since summer 2006 and an increasing demand for durable goods. read article

In other news, the Financial Times has found that the group of AAA-rated countries has decreased by 60% since 2007, and Warren Buffet will become one of Goldman Sachs’ ten biggest investors after exercising some warrants issued in 2008. read article

This morning…
Cyprus‘ central bank announced some details on the impending haircuts, saying uninsured deposits at Cyprus Popular Bank (Laiki) could be cut by 4/5th. The estimated 40% haircut seems to remain the benchmark for larger insured deposits. According to WSJ:

Based on estiamtes from government officials, the losses would affect some 19,000 deposit-holders at the Bank of Cyprus who, combined, hold some €8.01 billion in uninsured deposits. Uninsured savers at Cyprus Popular Bank, who hold a combined €3.2 billion, will lose most of that.

The Bank of England said British banks were facing a £25bn capital shortfall with regards to compliance with new banking standards. read article

So long.

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Brussels vs Moscow, and Bernanke leaving the Fed

Yesterday…

the Federal Reserve confirmed its asset purchasing program worth $85bn per month to continue until the US economy would improve past the first scarce signs of recovery. read article

Ben Bernanke also alluded to leaving the Fed to pursue other projects, retirement for example. read article

The UK budget saw five more years of spending cuts, right past the 2015 elections to alleviate the country from its £121bn budget deficit and ensure its credit rating. The Office of Budget Responsibility expects 2013 growth to be at 0.6%, followed by 1.8% in 2014read article

Elsewhere, this happened over the course of yesterday: Cyprus’ Finance Minister conferred with Russia, while Angela Merkel said Cypriot banks had to chip in for the bailout, followed by Brussels saying that Cyprus had to present its own refinancing plan after voting against the EU proposal. It all looked like we had a new credible exit candidate until Cyprus asked for more time to come up with a better idea. Now it just looks like Greece. Here are four scenarios that could unfold over the coming days and weeks.

This morning…

The European Central Bank announced that Cyprus had until 25 March, coming Monday, to get its bailout plan ready without losing access to the ECB’s Emergency Liquidity Assistance (ELA) that keeps the island’s banks alive. read article

Finally, China released some promising manufacturing data, showing the sector expand faster than expected and giving the recovery hypothesis more support. read article

So long.

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UK triple-dip on steroids; finance lobby fights in DC

There won’t be an update tomorrow, Wednesday, March 13th. 

In the UK, George Osborne announced that his Funding for Lending scheme, which has yet to prove effective in any way, will be extended and enhanced, in his words put on steroids. Currently geared to drive down mortgage prices, the reformed scheme will also benefit SMEs. Meanwhile, the county fears the reality of its third recessionsince the financial crisis as manufacturing output shrank again – at the fastest rate since July. read article

Over in the US, the financial services lobby is marching on Washington, much as it has in Europe, just with more funding. The matter at hand are not bonuses, but policy proposals that could lead to the forcible restructuring and breaking up of big banks. Goodbye, Citigroup, goodbye, too big to fail. read article

The Mexican government is taking on billionaire Carlos Slim, who ownes large parts of the country’stelecommunications sector. The proposal would force Slim to sell assets and open the market for foreign competitors. Upon Enrique Pena Nieto‘s election in July 2012 hopes for economic reform, particularly in Mexico’s oil market, rose. read article

Hungary passed an amendment to its constitution, allowing prosecutors to choose the judges that will hear their cases. Both Brussels and the US are skeptical of the vote and even more skeptical of the state of democracy in Hungary following the change. In December 2011, there was a letter exchange between Jose Manuel Barosso, President of the European Commission, and Viktor Orban, Prime Minister of Hungary, regarding the country’s funding from Brussels and its compliance with EU laws, showing Hungary’s drive for independence while expecting full financial backupread article

So long.

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