Death Star Economics

Icon

ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

All according to plan – US set to grow 3%; China’s slowdown on purpose

Over the weekend…
the UK lost its Fitch-assigned AAA rating on the back of the weak economy and poor outlook. Moody’s downgraded the country in February, but also assigned a negative outlook, while Fitch is optimistic that the UK will return to credit-worthy prosperity around 2014/2015. read article

In Italy, Giorgio Napolitano was re-elected President for the coming seven years on Saturday. The independent is expected to propose a bipartisan cabinet, considering that he was elected by both sides of the political spectrum to avoid another round of elections. Everybody except for Beppe Grillo seems happy; he had called Napolitano’s re-election a coup d’etat. read article

The G20 meeting ended with everyone promising to not engage in competitive devaluation of currencies, defending Japan’s monetary policy as appropriate and targeting domestic demand. read article

This morning…
word got out that the US will see 3% growth in July, due to a reform of the methodology behind government statistics. 21st century GDP also takes film royalties and R&D spending into account:

Billions of dollars of intangible assets will enter the gross domestic product of the world’s largest economy in a revision aimed at capturing the changing nature of US output.” read article

Meanwhile in China, central bank Governor Zhou Xiaochuan justified the country’s below-expectations growth rate of 7.7% in the first quarter of 2013, saying slow growth was necessary as structural reforms are being put into place. read article

Otherwise the counter-austerity voices are getting louder again, this time it’s Pimco’s Bill Gross (not that surprising) and Jose Manuel Barroso of all people, the President of the European Commission. Could this be the beginning of the end of Angela Austerity Merkel’s dominance in European policy? Probably not.

So long.

Advertisements

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Budget cuts and peripheral misery

Today at midnight (Saturday morning in the old world), the US is facing the much discussed spending cuts, decreasing government spending by €85bn until the end of the federal budget year in September. Maybe it’s time to depart from discussing the sheer possibility of this scenario. If you believe Bernankethe pain will be close to intolerable, slowing the economy down by 1.5%. The Congressional Budget Office estimates a 0.6% decrease in GDP. If you believe Fortunecompany earnings are strong enough to allow ignoring the issue. Without a budget fix, the automatic cuts will continue in the following financial year. read article

And things aren’t pretty in Europe’s periphery either. First, numbers out of Spain showed that Spanish corporations faced the largest decrease in earnings ever recorded in Q4, including Bankia’s €19.2bn net loss. Meanwhile in ItalyBersani rejected all rumors regarding coalition talks with Berlusconi. Over in Greece, 2012 revenue targets were missed and the burden of unpaid taxes increased, causing skepticism in Brussels, where the next loan instalment, worth €2.8bn, can be withheld if Greece’ financial report is not satisfactory. At the same time, the IMF, usually in bed with the EU, was more positive, saying Greece had collected more taxes recently and could avoid a further reduction in government salaries.

We shouldn’t forget, however, that despite the mess that is Southern Europe (oh yes, I made that generalization), there are still countries out there that want to join the union and currency. Poland, for example, which originally wanted to have the euro by 2012, is now discussing meeting all criteria (the same criteria that Greece met once…) by 2015read article

In India, Q4 GDP growth dropped to 4.5%, as the government announced a more pro-business deficit-reducing budget for the coming year. read article

Otherwise, Andrew Mason removed from his position as CEO of discount firm Groupon, which recorded losses in the last two quarters of 2012. In his own words:

After four and a half intense and wonderful years as C.E.O. of Groupon, I’ve decided that I’d like to spend more time with my family. Just kidding – I was fired today. If you’re wondering why… you haven’t been paying attention.

Weekend reading

– The “Because I Can” attitude of senior managementread article

– Dear Banker, this is how we’ll pay you in the futureread article 1 read article 2

– the European Union and Ricardian equivalenceread article

Have a good one.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Italian elections: the morning after the morning after

As expected, center-left Pier Luigi Bersani is looking to form a minority government to lead Italy out of its post-election stalemate misery. A minority government with whom, you wonder? Well, Bersani asked for everyone’s support to curb austerity and promote job creation. Meanwhile, Mario Monti, who definitely lost the election, is considering leaving a €3.9bn bailout of Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena be until the new administration is in place. Someone’s had enough. read article

Unfortunately for Italy, the country will try to sell €6.5bn worth of debt today.

Over in Brusselsnervous voices get louder with regard to the ECB, formerly known to do whatever it takes to save the euro for the Europeans through its OMT program. With Italy so obviously against austerity measures, future budget cuts that could be conditional for help from the ECB seem out of the questionread article

When addressing the Senate Banking Committee yesterday, Ben Bernanke advocated the Fed’s current course on monetary policy, saying the risks were clearly outweighed and investors should be encouraged by fair values and high corporate earnings. read article

J.P. Morgan is planning to fire up to 17,000 people, 6.5% of its staff, over the next two years in an effort to reduce costs by $1bn.annually. Most cuts will take place in 2014 in the bank’s mortgage groupread article

In other news, Visa and Samsung have struck a deal to advance mobile payments through Visa’s payWave software, and Chuck Hagel‘s nomination to US Secretary of Defense has been passed by the Senate. read article

So long.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Italian elections – Berlusconi with a vengeance

Italy is left in limbo without a conclusive election result, probably another round of elections looming, preceded by an embarrassing attempt by [presumably] Pier Luigi Bersani to form a coalition, and a full re-appearance of Silvio Berlusconi on the political stage (in the Senate). But despite the obvious screw-up that this election seems to be, there are clear winners and losers: Mario Monti, in the rational corner, plays the role of the latter. Beppe Grillo, anti-euro comedian in the ridiculous corner, came out heading the largest single party in the country’s lower house. Winner. Inconclusive is only one way of putting it, although I guess we can gather that the Italian people generally have an issue with austerity measures. Let the name-calling begin. read article

Just in: Bersani will hold a press conference at 5pm CET in Rome.

Summarizing some reactions:

Notably, the European markets display alarming symptoms of contagion: Italian elections drove up yields in Spain, Portugal, Greece and Ireland, and pulled down yields in Germany, France, the Netherlands, Austria and Finland.

Meanwhile, everything Italian that can be bought or rather sold is about to be subject to a short-selling ban. Elsewhere, US stocks fell the most since November of last year, with the volatility index at its 2013 record high.

But there are a couple of other things quietly happening in the background. The Japanese government will sell a third of its 50+% stake in Japan Tobacco, the third largest tobacco company and formerly a Japanese monopoly. The sale comes as part of policies to reduce stakes in state-backed companies to raise funds for this economic recovery that’s taking so long. read article

Over in the Netherlands, Rabobank, commonly clean slate poster-child bank, one of the safest institutions and bailout-free, is looking at a $440m+ in fines for involvement in the Libor rate rigging scandal. The fine could come as early as May. read article

Back in New York at Moody’s, it seems like lessons have been learned since 2008. The rating agency announced that any mortgage-backed securities can’t receive top ratings any longer. Aa is the new Aaa. Other agencies are expected to follow suit. read article

So long.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Italy at the polls; UK loses triple-A rating

Over the weekend, the UK lost its triple-A rating, with Moody’s downgrading the country to Aa1. The pound is weak and nobody is surprised. But Moody’s also cut the rating of the Bank of England, which is confusing, considering the outrageously unlikely event of a central bank default. In other words:

The question then is: what exactly does a rating mean for a sovereign which borrows in its own currency? Right now, it seems little bar political pain.

Responding to said political pain, George Osborne said he wouldn’t bow under pressure from the opposition and have Britain stick to the course of austerityread article
 
The first exit polls for the Italian election will be coming in at 2pm GMT today, when voting stations close. So far the election has seen topless feminists screaming for the end of Berlusconi’s rule over Italy (…), and a 55.2% voter turnout, 7.3% less than last year. read article
 
In Cyprus, Nicos Anastasiades’ center-right party has won the election with a 57.5% majority, leaving the country’s bailout to be finalized by the new government and the EU. Anastasiades, however, likes to think of himself as not just another sheep-like follower of the regime of international lenders, and wants to reach a deal that doesn’t include privatizations, which are believed to raise up to €2bn. read article 
 
Meanwhile in the US, only four days are left to steer the country away from the sequester. So far neither side of the table seems to a have an idea how, despite Obama’s begging for compromise. read article
 
In other news, the Deepwater Horizon trial begins today and Japan‘s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is looking to nominate a new governor for the country’s central bank. So far, possible choices, which include the current President of the Asian Development Bank, are all pro-stimulusread article
 
Have a good week.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 213 other followers

%d bloggers like this: