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Eurozone recession here to stay, UK gets ready for exit

Yesterday…
David Cameron and his comrades of the Conservative Party published a policy draft for a referendum for a possible EU-exit of the UK. The draft says the referendum has to be completed by December 2017, given the Tories win the 2015 elections. I think the campaigning just began. read BBC

While the global “recovery” continues to force deficits to skyrocket and imports to slump, India has managed to become the outlier in the trend on Monday afternoon. Taking advantage of the low gold price, imports rose 138% since April 2012 to $7.5bn, or 18% of all imports, while the trade deficit hit 17.8bn. read Zerohedge

And of course the drama over Bloomberg‘s use of user data continued… read FT Alphaville

This morning…
there was a flood of data, with the German economy growing 0.1% from 4Q12 to the first quarter of 2013, undercutting the depressing estimate of 0.3% growth. The French economy contracted by 0.2% over the same period of time. read Bloomberg
Franco-German relations haven’t been great since Hollande got into office, but this morning’s result may just worsen the atmosphere of any policy discussion. The eurozone as such, contracted 0.2% in 1Q13. The recession continues…

Simultaneously, Mervyn “it’s-almost-his-last-day” King of the Bank of England raised the outlook for the UK economy [with lower inflation] and raised his eyebrows at eurozone performance, as well as the continental Financial Transaction Tax. read Guardian

Meanwhile, the US is preparing to become the model student again. The Congressional Budget Office is forecasting the deficit to fall as far as $378bn by 2015, much faster than anticipated. The 2013 forecast was cut by $203bn to an overall $642bn. read Reuters
And that is not all: Formerly the largest corporate debt market in the world, providing ample opportunity for the Michael Milken followers of the world to make money, China is going to take that spot within the next two years, according to S&P. Soon America will be debt and deficit free and flow with milk and vodka (we’re all grown-ups here). read Financial Times

In the kerfuffle over whether Jamie Dimon is allowed to stay in in his double-role as chairman and CEO of JPMorgan seems to be blowing over (much like Lloyd Blankfein expected), as fewer shareholders than expected are looking to back the leadership reform. Another bullet dodged for the industry. read Financial Times

And in case you’ve been in a good mood this morning, have a look at this: 10 Scenes from the ongoing global economic collapse (Zerohedge)

So long.

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Portugal could need second bailout (to pay for the first)

This morning…

the Eurogroup is meeting in Dublin; on the menu: stop messing around with bank stress tests (i.e. tighten measures) and the bailout schemes of Portugal and Ireland. Some say even if Portugal was granted an extension of its bailout repayment, it could potentially face a second collapse and thus a second bailout. Ireland is looking in the same gloomy direction. According to the FT:

Lisbon’s bailout is due to come to an end in July 2014 and the extension of maturities of its bailout loans is intended to smooth its full return to markets. But it has to raise €14,1bn next year and €15bn in 2015, whereas before the crisis it was typically raising €10-€12bn a year. Ireland is also facing a big financing challenge. It needs to refinance €20bn per year from 2016-20, which is about 12 per cent of the country’s projected economic output for this year.

Thus, the world is quiet in anticipation of next week’s news country of choice. It might be early days for Slovenia, so maybe it’ll drift back to Cyprus or Italy.

Meanwhile, Japan will officially enter the Asia-Pacific trade talks this summer, which are currently held between Canada, Mexico, Australia, Chile, Peru, Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam, Brunei and the US. read article

Weekend reading…
– The Economist on Margaret Thatcher‘s legacy, read article

– William Cohan on the revolving door between Wall Street and the White House, read article

Climate change may double turbulence on transatlantic flights, read article

– The Winklevoss twins are all over bitcoin, read article

JPMorgan explains why you should avoid investment banks, read article

Have a good one.

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Cypriot banks re-open, German unemployment higher

Yesterday…
word got out that UK banks Lloyds and Royal Bank of Scotland, both backed by tax money, needed to raise an additional £9bn in correspondence to capital requirements set by international banking regulators. The additional cash needs to be on the balance sheets (£3bn for Lloyds, £6bn for RBS) by the end of this year. read article

This morning…
Cyprus is making history by being the first EU country to impose restrictions on capital flows, “with limits on credit card transactions, daily withdrawals, money transfers abroad and the cashing of cheques.” The withdrawal limit seems to be €300 per day, while transfers of more than €5,000 will require central bank approval. read article

German unemployment rose by 13,000 people, as opposed to an expected drop, while German 10-year bunds dropped to their lowest yield since early August 2012 (1.255%).

Meanwhile in Asia, the Bank of Japan has already exceeded its self-imposed limit on asset purchasing limit (well done) and South Korea cut its 2013 growth forecast from 3% to 2.3%.

Easter reading… – a list of people who are investigating JP Morgan, read article
– what extremely successful people were doing in their 20s, read article
– greatness of nations: India vs China, read article

Happy Easter, have a good one.

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Judgment day for J.P. Morgan

There won’t be an email on Monday and Tuesday of next week, 18/19 March 2012.

Today, the London Whale Senate hearing starts in DC, led by John McCain and including testimony from former CIO Ina Drew who left the firm in May 2012. The allegations include a failure to appropriately report on the $6bn trading losses, misleading regulators and investors. read article

Following the Fed stress testBank of America is set to buy back $5bn of shares and $5.5bn of preferred stock, while J.P. Morgan will buy back $6bn in common stock. Goldman Sachs will also be allowed to repurchase shares, but overall the Fed seems worried about J.P. Morgan‘s and Goldman‘s capital structures: the banks will have to submit revised capital plans by September. read article

The British Parliamentary Commission on Banking Standards (PCBS) stated that the UK didn’t need a ban on proprietary trading, mirrored from the American Volcker rule. The Commission suggested capital requirements as alternative tools and cited the difficulty of defining proprietary trading appropriately. Future BoE Governor Mark Carney agrees as well. read article

After months of investigations and grounded fleets, Boeing’s Dreamliners could be back in the air “within weeks”. The spontaneously igniting batteries have been replaced and “only” need approval from the Federal Aviation Administration to be ready for take-off. Japanese authorities remain skeptical and declined to put a date on when the Dreamliners could fly again. Either way, Boeing doesn’t have the capacity to replace batteries in all 50 active planes simultaneouslyread article

While the EU-US trade agreement is in the works, Japan has entered negotiations for a similar deal for Pacific nations. read article

Meanwhile, Greece, or rather the Hellenic Republic Asset Development Fund, is selling gas and gambling companies as part of its privatization campaign. Get in there while it’s cheap. read article

Last night, Samsung launched its latest smart phone in the Radio City Music Hall in New York. A review from All Things D, here.

Weekend reading:

– the America we used to know, read article

– the US is more energy self-sufficient, except China wants to own all their natural gas fueling stationsread article

– when hedge funds get personal: the Herbalife background storyread article

 Have a good weekend.

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Italian elections: the morning after the morning after

As expected, center-left Pier Luigi Bersani is looking to form a minority government to lead Italy out of its post-election stalemate misery. A minority government with whom, you wonder? Well, Bersani asked for everyone’s support to curb austerity and promote job creation. Meanwhile, Mario Monti, who definitely lost the election, is considering leaving a €3.9bn bailout of Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena be until the new administration is in place. Someone’s had enough. read article

Unfortunately for Italy, the country will try to sell €6.5bn worth of debt today.

Over in Brusselsnervous voices get louder with regard to the ECB, formerly known to do whatever it takes to save the euro for the Europeans through its OMT program. With Italy so obviously against austerity measures, future budget cuts that could be conditional for help from the ECB seem out of the questionread article

When addressing the Senate Banking Committee yesterday, Ben Bernanke advocated the Fed’s current course on monetary policy, saying the risks were clearly outweighed and investors should be encouraged by fair values and high corporate earnings. read article

J.P. Morgan is planning to fire up to 17,000 people, 6.5% of its staff, over the next two years in an effort to reduce costs by $1bn.annually. Most cuts will take place in 2014 in the bank’s mortgage groupread article

In other news, Visa and Samsung have struck a deal to advance mobile payments through Visa’s payWave software, and Chuck Hagel‘s nomination to US Secretary of Defense has been passed by the Senate. read article

So long.

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Sequestation is no medical term

Amusing as ever, the Wall Street Journal and the Financial Times try to sell us two different worlds this morning. As for WSJ:

Meanwhile, the economy is improving, central banks continue to pump money into the financial system, corporate earnings aren’t horrible and turmoil in Washington has waned.

While elsewhere, the FT announces “US faces fresh financial shock.” Well, that’s confusing. The problem at hand is the sequester, another beast of $1.2tn in automatic spending cuts, passed in 2011 and in effect from March 1. It cuts the Pentagon’s budget by $600bn until 2023, while the same amount is cut from other discretionary government spending.

Unlike the fiscal cliff deals – which was widely anticipated – the sequester would cause a big hit to 2013 growth forecasts. According to forecasting firm Macroeconomic Advisers, the sequester would knock 0.7 percentage points off growth in 2013, taking its forecast down from 2.6 to 1.9 per cent.

In the business of fixing rates, the attention shifts to Singapore, where internal reviews have uncovered a scheme to fix rates for non-deliverable foreign exchange forwards. When the Libor scandal broke lose in London, Singapore’s regulator ordered financial institutions to review their rate submission processes to the Association of Banks in Singapore, which publishes the benchmark. JP Morgan, UBS, HSBC and DBS are the most active players in Singapore’s offshore FX market. read article

In ItalyMonte dei Paschi di Siena is looking for a new investor. He should have at least €720m lying around to pay a potential fine for derivatives trades between 2006 and 2007, and not be part of any center-left political movement. A dislike of moral high horses would also come in handy. read article

Otherwise, Toyota is once again the world’s largest car manufacturer according to 2012 figures, taking its old place at the top back from General Motors.

So long.

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Eurozone crisis: Just grow out of it, stupid!

After yesterday’s news of the shrinking German economy, Spanish PM Mariano Rajoy called on all those country’s who aren’t Spain, Portugal, Ireland, Greece, Cyrpus, really also Italy and maybe not even France, to implement growth stimulating policies as long as they can, because Spain sure can’t. This is the same Spain that still hasn’t called the ECB for help. Should someone break the news that Europe might not just grow out of this crisis? Maybe. But it’s siesta now. Let’s wait. read article

In the meantime, the German central bank is working on the logistics of getting 700 pounds of gold back into German vaults. At this point most of it is stored at the New York Fed, with the rest of it locked up in Paris, a precaution that is still in place from the cold warread article

The Netherlands‘ fourth largest bank SNS Reaal announced that it would need a restructuring due to its toxic property loans in autumn 2012. Now, the bailout will have to be carried out by the government. According to a decision by the European Commission, Dutch banks ING and ABN Amro will not be allowed to be part of the restructuring, because they received bailouts during the financial crisis. One scenario would be the creation of a bad bank for said loans, with all other big Dutch banks as shareholders. Hello over there at the Basel committee! Does this sound systemically risk-free to you? Altogether, it is estimated that SNS Reaal will need about €1.2-1.8bn to keep its doors open. In 2008, the bank received €750m from the government. read article

Otherwise, there are a number for “Facebook searching for revenue” headlines out there, because the website just launched its own search function, which despite it’s lose limits on Facebook itself, is stepping onto Google’s turf. Has that ever been a good idea? read article

And speaking of corporate catfights. It seems obvious that EADS has won the “massive plane”-round against Boeing. The Dreamliner (787), competitor aircraft to the A380, doesn’t seem to fly so well. This morning All Nippon Airlines and Japan Air grounded their 787 fleets for review, after yet another Dreamliner had to perform an emergency landing due to technical difficulties. read article

A whole truckload of banks announce fourth quarter earnings today, including JP Morgan, which has just announced to cut CEO Jamie Dimon’s salary in response to his responsibility in the London Whale case.

So long.

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EU cuts its losses on bank bailouts

The week starts relatively quiet with some news from Europe and last week’s news from Japan.

The EU is doing something that could be interpreted as cutting its losses: in a redraft of terms and conditions for countries whose banks sought a bailout from the European Stability Mechanism (ESM). Under the new proposal, the countries in question (Spain, Ireland, Cyprus) will have to co-invest [into the failing banks] alongside the ESM or guarantee indemnities for the EU fund. Fair enough, but why only now? Is it possible that the real smart guys in Brussels noticed that money is finite? read article

In the background S&P is riding the New Year’s resolution wave and announced that 2013 will be a turning point for Europe: it will quit smoking, lose weight and stop defaulting on debt. read article

And it generally seems to have been a busy weekend in Brussels. After UPS proposed a €5.2bn takeover bid for Dutch delivery firm TNT Express, the Commission now swore to block the deal under antitrust rules. In response, TNT’s shares fell by 49%. read article

In other news, Swiss watch maker Swatch bought luxury jeweller Harry Winston for $750m, AIG is suing the New York Fed over bond issuer rights and investment banks Credit Suisse and Deutsche Bank are considering bonus cuts of up to 20%.

After the London Whale shook all of JP Morgan‘s senior management, prompting six of the 15 members of the firm’s operating committee to leave, the bank is now issuing a report for its board of directorsblaming CEO Jamie Dimon, ex-CFO Doug Braunstein and ex-CIO Ina Drew for the losses incurred. The board will vote on whether the report should be made public tomorrow, a day ahead of the firm’s earnings report. read article

So long.

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“Biopolar enthusiasm” and the fiscal cliff

The Daily News Brief is going on Christmas holiday for a while and will be back in the new year.

The general consensus says we are making progress to make an outline to make a plan to move away from the fiscal cliff. Today even more so than yesterday. After Boehner’s proposal yesterday (look he has a chart), Obama came back suggesting tax increases for those with $400,000+ annual income, but apparently that is not his last offer. Then why even bother analyzing it? Reuters says, the mad velocity by which the negotiations are taking shape, “put[s] a deal realistically within reach.” read article

ZeroHedge sums it up:

By this point it has become clear to everyone that all fact-based news can be safely ignored […] it is clear that following yesterday’s detailed disclosure, the market is convinced, that a deal is virtually assured. This is a start contrast to 48 hours ago, when it thought the opposite. […] the latest bubble of bipolar enthusiasm which has now shifted to euphoric for the time being.

Also in the US. the Massachusetts Security Division of the SEC is kicking of the year in review part of 2012, reminding us just how much was blaming and blogging [about the blaming] was going on around the Facebook IPO, the company’s valuation and the decline of its stocks. Seven months later, almost to the date, Morgan Stanley was fined $5m for having failed to supervise its staff during the time of the IPO, i.e. for trying to influence research analysts right before the offering. Morgan Stanley paid up without denying or admitting to anything. Citigroup has already been fined $2m for “improper disclosures” and both Goldman Sachs and J.P. Morgan have been subpoenaedread article

J.P. Morgan is also being sued by the US Credit Union for Bear Stearn’s creation of mortgages worth $3.6bn that were distributed to clients under false information and later blew up in their faces. J.P. Morgan acquired Bear Stearns in 2008. read article

Meanwhile, Europe is entirely out of office now – the biggest news are that Germany‘s Bundesbank is expected negative GDP growth in Q4, while the European Commission gave the okay for the €3.9bn bailout of Monte dei Paschi di Siena, Italy’s third largest bank. Monti’s candidacy for the 2013 Italian election circus will stay up for discussion until Friday morning, so most Italian news will continue to be dominated by Berlusconi’s upcoming wedding. Brussels also filed a report regarding Spain‘s public debt, which is likely to keep rising if the country fails to reform its pensions system. According to the report, Spanish pensions will exceed the average EU spend until 2060. The other nation at risk, in part due to its pension spending, appears to be Cyprus which received aid from Brussels in June. read article

So much from me, happy holidays!

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The unexpected: A deal for Greece, a Canadian for the BoE

The Eurogroup has completed its first successful Greece-related meeting measured by the measurability of its results. In short: we got a deal. It’s not a haircut (go Germany!), but it’s not far from it. The deal finally releases the delayed €34.4bn bailout tranche. Before the money is wired down south however, Greece has to buy some of its debt back [i.e. buying outstanding bonds at a massive discount price]. The deadline is mid-December. Other changes in T&Cs are cuts of interest rates on debt from the first bailout and a €7bn payment of profits from Greek debt held by international creditors. Two that are especially hurt by these measures are Spain and Italy, whose interest on Greek bonds held is getting cut as well, while their own borrowing costs are much higher. Although the Eurogroup agreed to lift Greece’ debt:GDP target from 120% to 124% in 2020, it is meant to be below 110% by 2022. So maybe that’s when the world economy will be fully revived. The IMF refuses to free up new funds until the debt buyback is finalizedread article

Yesterday afternoon, the Bank of England appointed Mervyn King’s replacement. The bank’s new governor is Mark Carney, Harvard PhD and governor of the Bank of Canada and ex-Goldman Sachs (consult map below). I’m pretty sure William Cohan is about to write another book as you read this. A summary from Twitter.

– ZeroHedge: GOLDMAN’S TAKE OVER OF EVERY CENTRAL BANK IS NOW COMPLETE

– Peter Spiegel: Do I have this right? The British government just appointed a Canadian to head its central bank? #StillAColony?

– Matina Stevis: #eurogroup reporters gasp at #carney #boe announcement partly because there’s nothing to report on from here yet. #Greece

– [again] ZeroHedge: Oh, and dear Germans… Completing The Circle: Meet The US Ambassador To Germany http://www.zerohedge.com/news/completing-circle-meet-us-ambasador-germany

Carney, who previously also headed the Financial Stability Board, was approached about the job in April, as the FT reported then.

More detail on ZeroHedge’s comment including a map of how Goldman Sachs runs Europeread article

Next thing you know Jamie Dimon is in the run up as Treasury Secretaryread article

In the US, Mary Schapiro, head of the Securities and Exchange Commission, has been replaced by Elise Walter, who previously heading Finra, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority. read article

In other news, ING repaid another €1.125bn to the Dutch government, including €375m interest, which saved the bank with a €10bn bailout. Following the latest repayment, ING stills owes €1.2bn plus interest.

Otherwise, the OECD slashed its 2013 growth forecast for developed economies. Back in May, the estimate was still at 2.2%. The revised forecast sees only 1.4% growthSouth Africa’s GDP grew at the slowest pace since the hight of the financial crisis in 2009, reducing to 1.2% on the back of decreasing mining output following massive strikes and lack of reformread article

So long.

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