Death Star Economics

Icon

ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

All according to plan – US set to grow 3%; China’s slowdown on purpose

Over the weekend…
the UK lost its Fitch-assigned AAA rating on the back of the weak economy and poor outlook. Moody’s downgraded the country in February, but also assigned a negative outlook, while Fitch is optimistic that the UK will return to credit-worthy prosperity around 2014/2015. read article

In Italy, Giorgio Napolitano was re-elected President for the coming seven years on Saturday. The independent is expected to propose a bipartisan cabinet, considering that he was elected by both sides of the political spectrum to avoid another round of elections. Everybody except for Beppe Grillo seems happy; he had called Napolitano’s re-election a coup d’etat. read article

The G20 meeting ended with everyone promising to not engage in competitive devaluation of currencies, defending Japan’s monetary policy as appropriate and targeting domestic demand. read article

This morning…
word got out that the US will see 3% growth in July, due to a reform of the methodology behind government statistics. 21st century GDP also takes film royalties and R&D spending into account:

Billions of dollars of intangible assets will enter the gross domestic product of the world’s largest economy in a revision aimed at capturing the changing nature of US output.” read article

Meanwhile in China, central bank Governor Zhou Xiaochuan justified the country’s below-expectations growth rate of 7.7% in the first quarter of 2013, saying slow growth was necessary as structural reforms are being put into place. read article

Otherwise the counter-austerity voices are getting louder again, this time it’s Pimco’s Bill Gross (not that surprising) and Jose Manuel Barroso of all people, the President of the European Commission. Could this be the beginning of the end of Angela Austerity Merkel’s dominance in European policy? Probably not.

So long.

Advertisements

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“The ECB is by and large done [trying to help you]”

The moment when it’s not the Greeks who don’t live up to their promises: the troika wants to delay the next debt tranche despite the deal on austerity measures, to wait for a full report on compliance with the bailout terms. At the core of the issue is the €5bn repayment due next week, but the next bailout tranche is also connected to a two-year extension to 2016 for Greek aid. So far, so bad. While the EU seems to be mainly concerned with the restructuring of debt that will never be repaid, the IMF worries whether Greece will ever return to growthread article

Mario Draghi, fed up, announced the ECB was done supporting Greece. And you can’t blame the man who has been waiting for Spain to make one, just one, phone call for the past two months, and who is being chased by German lawmakers scared of inflation. As a last act of kindness, he said the  €12-15bn profits the ECB made on the €55bn of Greek debt it owns should go back to the country itself.

Meanwhile, France is expected to slip into recession by the time the year comes to an end. In SpainIberia, which is owned by IAG, just as British Airways, will cut the airline’s 21,000-people workforce by a quarter in an effort to turn the loss-making business around. That’s just what Spain ordered. read article

The Telegraph broke a story saying that UK tax authorities got a hold of the details of every British HSBC client in Jersey. Mind you, Jersey is a tax-haven, population 98,000 (and most of them are accountants). The list of names was obtained from a whistle-blower, who didn’t get the memo that the EU whistle-blower-incentive is not actually in place yet. It features drug lords, weapon smugglers and fraudstersHSBC, of course, will have to pay between $1.5-2bn for breaching anti-money laundering rules in the US and Mexico. For those that remain sceptical of a whistle-blower from Jersey or the journalistic standards of the Telegraph:

Early viewers of what promises to be a trashy little mini-series with a stale mix of guns, drugs, sun-soaked beaches and tax cops, were left with one stand-out question on Friday: Does HSBC have just 4,388 Brits holding offshore accounts on this Channel island?

Weekend reading

– Interactive infographic for real GDP, unemployment and inflation developments in Europe, read article

– El-Erian’s 4-point plan to save the US economyread article

– The Asian way: economic stability in the 21st century, read article

– Democrats and Wall Street, version 2.0 read article

– From law to oil to Paris to … the new archbishop of Canterburyread article

Have a good one.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Election prep and Darwinian finance

With the US presidential election on the agenda for next week Tuesday, this weekend is used by all news outlets of the world and really anybody with a n opinion (thanks, internet…) to publish op-eds on said matter. So here we go.

– The Economist endorsed Obama as indirectly as possible (of course they did), read article

– The Washington Post’s Wonkbook looks at campaign expenditure, concluding that this election is the most expensive on record, read article

– Pimco’s Bill Gross is disgruntled about America and rewrites the Pledge of Allegianceread article

– The FT’s data blog looks at the importance of economic issues in the election read article

– Mayor Bloomberg, who is not member of any party, also endorsed Obama, saying that “Hurricane Sandy had reshaped his thinking, read article

Today’s US employment figures show that 3.57 million people are currently out of work in America as opposed to 4.11 million last year. Yet, the unemployment rate increased from September, amounting to 7.9%, exceeding the rate of January 2009. Estimates had seen 125,000 jobs added; the number was beaten by 46,000 new employees. read article

Commerzbank, Dexia and Lloyds TSB were removed from the list of G-SIFIs (global systemically important financial institutions) or G-SIBs (global systemically important banks) or “the world’s most dangerous banks” like the German FT calls it, due to diminishing “global systemic importance”. Ouch. That’s a weird insult, but an insult nontheless. After all, having the “evil” stipped off of them by a couple fo Swiss regulators, pushes them towards irrelevance, if you will. CitigroupDeutsche BankHSBC and JP Morgan are the four giants at the top of the list, required to hold an additional 2.5% in common equity to meet requirements set out by risk-management regulation Basel III. The general requirement amounts to 7% equity holdings as a percentage of risk-weighed assets. read article

The other big topic this week is the supposed end of investment banking as an industry/career/ethos. Triggered by UBS’ mass firing and essential termination of its fixed income unit on Tuesday, this a welcomed turn of events for those who either supported Occupy [insert location], or critically observed the developments in more stable housing. The WSJ bemoaned the death of fixed income, while the Economist compared core competencies. Gillian Tett wrote about a paper that examines the fluctuations in financial services as a career destination, and Harvard Business School announced that more of its graduates were now heading into consulting rather than investment banking. Because that’s what a world in shambles really need… more fucking consultants.

Election-unrelated weekend reading:

– Greece finds Medea: what happens when you talk about tax evasionread article

 Sandy and climate change on the cover of Businessweek, read article

– Felix Salmon‘s take on the above, read article

– Leaving China and going … where? read article

Have a good one.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 212 other followers

%d bloggers like this: