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ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

An attempt at revival

This week…

Things in Turkey continued to be messy, as Erdogan’s stern view of protesters continues to spark new anger among the masses and sent the Turkish Lira falling. read Bloomberg
On Thursday, Erdogan re-iterated that he was losing patience with the protestors. Today, the government and its counter movement reached an agreement, while Germany delayed further EU accession talks with Turkey. read WSJ

In Greece, the doors of Hellenic Broadcasting Corp closed, sending 2,500 former employees out onto the streets. It is meant to be relaunched later this year in a slimmed-down version. read WSJ

In the UK, jobless claims dropped, suggesting that the recovery is well on its way (remember how we’ve been here roughly 700 hundred times now..?). read Bloomberg

And then there was Wednesday, when literally everyone with an audience called the bond bubble, for example Jim O’Neill (formerly of Goldman Sachs) and Bill Gross (Pimco)

Around the same time, Iraqi officials said the country was looking to increase its oil production by 29% in 2014 and 159% by 2020, showing that a) they can and b) they have buyers. read Emerging Frontiers

Then there was a new price fixing scandal [yes, there are still some products left]; this time in FX. read Felix Salmon

Meanwhile on Wall Street, notes on correlations with Japan: read WSJ

In Brussels, important issues like the size and curviture of bananas and cucumbers has been pushed aside as Washington’s lobbyists walked in to ensure EU privacy regulations wouldn’t get so strict that they could hurt US investigations overseas. read FT

Rupert Murdoch is divorcing Wendy Deng, could this be the actual reason for splitting News Corp? read New Yorker

The week ahead…

The G8 meet on the outskirts of London on Monday and Tuesday; anti-globalization protesters will ironically stick to central London, where they will follow a scavenger hunt-like course through the West end, mapped out here. Please refrain from buying condiments at Fortnum & Mason until the weekend, as you may otherwise be questioned about the social legitimacy of your job.

Otherwise, it’s going to be a Bernanke-dominated week – again – as the Fed is meeting and press conferencing. Although Bernanke tried to nullify the comments about an end of easing, saying that it would take “considerable” time until that would happen, everybody seems to think the US is going to turn the money tap off. read WSJ

Have a good one.

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Would Murdoch want to be new Greek finmin?

So about Greece… I’m sorry, but it’s one of those days. Finance minister Rapanos resigned yesterday due to health issues and prime minister Samaras announced that he will not be able to fly for two months due to his eye problem. What the… Rapanos may be replaced by Yiannis Stournaras, professor of economics at the University of Athens and one of those who hasn’t fled the country yet. Both the details and results of his health check are yet to be disclosed.

Newscorp is looking into splitting the company into separate entertainment and publishing divisions. What does this mean? Well, the legitimacy of the WSJ’s report on the story is up for discussion, as the journal is of course part of Newscorp. But Murdoch could stay in control of both parts, only mitigating the storm around the British newspaper units that were involved in the phone-hacking scandals, and not actually solving the problem that a demerger should presumably address (namely Murdoch owning everything). More importantly, a split would make it harder for the publishing division to find investors, despite its prime newspaper assets, because its growing at a much slower pace than the entertainment branch. Not really surprising, you’re comparing the WSJ and the Times to 20th Century Fox here… come on.

A new proposition from Brussels authored by the presidents of the Commission, Central Bank, Eurogroup and Council (mostly to set the stage for the summit later this week): In Dan Davies words [blatantly stolen from Twitter, yay for 140 characters]:

1. Pan-European single banking regulator – ie completely irrelevant to crisis, pure and simple power grab.

2. European deposit insurance & resolution schemes, backed by ESM – ie repurposing of existing fund, not in treaty. Nothing from ECB

3. “pooling of decision making on budgets” ie power grab

4. “issuance of common debt could be explored” – ie, jumping someone else’s train of ERF and Eurobills. No original work

5. “A full fiscal union” and what’s the most urgent issue about that? yup “it would need a central budget“.

6. “Towards an integrated economic policy framework” – equal parts sameold “stability and convergence” guff and power grab.

7. “Oh yeah, democratic legitimacy”. Insultingly brief 2 paragraph section, which just points you at Protocol 1 of TFEU.

(or read article)

In other European news, Cyprus has officially requested a bailout, the terms of which have not been finalized, but it’s like to be €8-10bn, and France is set to raise the minimum wage by 2% come July 1.

The woman in the news today is not Angela Merkel for a change, but Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg, who is now director of the company’s board, which so far had only been comprised of men. Well done Sheryl, girl power and all that.

At last, a chart and a reason why we shouldn’t be looking forward to September: according to a study by Luc Laeven and Fabian Valencia of the IMF, which relies on 147 cases over 41 years, September is the month of banking crisesread article

So long.

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