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ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

IMF joins Cyprus creditors; Fannie Mae records first profits in 6 years

There won’t be an update tomorrow, Thursday April 4th.

Yesterday…In the US, people are getting more nervous about the Fed’s spending spree. Eyeing over to Japan, that might be fair. Once again, it’s Jeffrey Lacker, President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, who doesn’t beat around the bush when it comes to disliking monetary policy. read article

Fannie Mae, which received a total of $116.1bn in bailout finance from the US Treasury since the financial crisis, officially returned back to black. For the financial year 2012, the mortgage business recorded $17.2bn in profit. Finally. Although things are looking up, $84.7bn of its bailout package remain outstanding. read article

Speaking of earnings, the SEC has given companies the okay to announce earnings and other news via Facebook and Twitter, throwing off all those institutions (read banks) that blocked social networking sites for their employees. read article

Cyprus’ Minister of Finance resigned, saying he had done his deed in negotiating the bailout deal. In related news, the IMF stated today that it will pay €1bn of the total €10bn bailout package for Cyrpus, spread out over three years.

This morning…
there’s little to talk about. By 9.45am the most striking news were that Apple may release two new phones this year, and even that was a story from yesterday. read article

Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy is looking towards Brussels to get the growth in Europe going (good luck with that) and stop the austerity vise (even more luck for that), asking for countries in the position to do so to spend more to stimulate the economy. read article

So long.

Death Star Economics
ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

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China curbs growth targets in light of social issues

There won’t be an update tomorrow, Wednesday March 6th.

News from China, where outgoing Prime Minister Wen Jiabao presented the country’s economic targets for 2013, including an unchanged GDP target of 7.5%, a lowered inflation target of 3.5% (down from 4%) and a budget deficit of RMB1.2tn, or 2% of GDPDefense spending will be boosted by 10.7%, a smaller increase than in any year since 1990. But the departing Premier also said that China’s growth model was unsustainable and on top of that paired with a whole array of social issues, like the income gap, increasing pollution and a real estate bubbleread article

Also in China, the SEC has been allowed to subpoena Deloitte’s China unit over accounting fraud at Chinese companies operating in the US. After initial co-operation between the American and Chinese securities regulators failed, this is a big step in terms of cross-border fraud investigations. read article

In other regulatory news, an undisclosed group of banks in the City of London have received a hat tip from law firm Shearman & Sterling that it was possible to fight the EU’s banker bonus cap [proposal] in courtread article 

Until then, enter George Osborne.

Otherwise, Apple’s stock fell to a new 52-week low yesterday, dragging the company’s market cap down below $400bn for the first time in over a year. 

So long.

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Fixing Japan – a bucket list

Japan is all over the news today, trying to weaken its currency (or not), stimulate growth and create jobs. It’s ambitious, to say the least. But it’s also good news for Europe. After all, new PM Shinzo Abe is planning to weaken the Japanese yen by buying euro-denominated bonds from the ESM: to save Europe, the world and its currency. Unfortunately  the world moves faster than politics and while business executives had begged for a weaker currency, they now fret that the yen could fall too far. Abe also set a 2% inflation target alongside stability and prosperity for everyone, causing Japan’s pension funds, which hold the second largest pool of retirement assets in the world after the United States, to increase their gold holdings from JPY45bn to JPY100bn. And then there is this hint of an idea to eliminate the interest-rate floor for deposits at the Bank of Japan, something the ECB has done as well to try and incentivize lending. The final policy decisions will be announced at the Bank of Japan’s meeting on 21-22 January.

In the background, Eurozone unemployment has once again broken all records, while German and Finnish exports declined. Meanwhile, Spain announced that it would have to issue €215-230bn gross debt throughout the year, which is 7.5% more than accounted for in the November budget.

Norway’s Foreign Minister Mats Persson has called on the UK to reconsider its currently rather hostile relationship with the EU to save the City of London and influence European legislation. During a trip to Ireland, Persson pointed out that Norway, while swimming in oil money, only had very marginal influence in its status as a member of the EEA (European Economic Area). read article

Follwing yesterday’s mortgage crisis-related settlement charges, Bank of America has agreed to pay $11.6bn to state-backed Fannie Mae, the Federal National Mortgage Association, which was bailed out during the crisis. The settlement regards mortgage putbacks, those loans Fannie Mae wants BoA to buy back due to their questionable nature. read article

After the American SEC took the first step in fighting services providers in December, when it opened the investigation into potentially fraudulent behavior of the big auditing companies in China, Ernst&Young is now subject of an Washington-based inquiryAllegation say E&Y lobbied on behalf of its clientscompromising its independence in auditing said corporates. In 2004, E&Y was suspended from entertaining new client businesses with publicly traded companies for six months in response to violating independence rules. read article

So long.

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No growth for Europe, Starbucks wants your love back

German central bank has cut its economic growth forecast for 2013 from 1.6% (June estimate) to 0.4%. Estimates for 2014 are back at 1.9%. Oh well, so we’ll wait another year and pour more money into Europe’s open wounds. No biggie. Yesterday, the ECB said if the recovery was to kick in in the second half of 2013 as hoped [Draghi would have said ‘expected’], the eurozone will grow 1.2% in 2014read article

Also in Germany, financial regulator BaFin sat in on Deutsche Bank’s audit committee meetings during the financial crisis and should therefore have known about the skewed numbers that may have saved the bank from requiring a government bailout. The SEC, who’s investigating the derivative mis-valuations, is bound to be pissed off. read article

When Starbucks started to write your name onto its white paper cups, that was an effort to make you feel more at home, more individually loved in each stock-standard store. Then the company was part of a tax avoidance case worth millions of pounds. Today, Starbucks issued an open letter from its UK managing director, promising to pay up to £20m more in corporate tax just to be nice. Of course, that is an image-protecting half-truth, because Starbucks, Google and Amazon had become the poster children of tax avoidance in the UK. Yet, paying so much money for a one-page add just to remind me that there will always be a barrister barista waiting for me, almost got me walking into a Starbucks this morning. Then I remembered that the coffee’s not that good.

In fiscal cliff news, everybody has returned to the negotiation table, or so it seems. On that note, a depressing visualization of US debt.

The US is also awaiting jobs data that will be completely distorted by Sandy. Meanwhile, Hillary Clinton is convinced that Russia is planning a new Soviet Union and must be stopped. read article

And finally, bidding farewell to the Financial Times Deutschland.

Weekend reading

– The New Yorker goes for lunch with Warren Buffetread article

– The FT got balls: In this opinion piece on the Autumn Statement, George Osborne became G-Dawgread article (click here for a picture of the print version)

– Why Dilma Rousseff needs a new economic advisorread article

– The US could create jobs by building a Death Starread article

Have a good one.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

SEC investigates big four, Boris Johnson wants EU referendum

The American SEC is investigating the Chinese operations of the big four (Ernst & Young, KPMG, Deloitte, PwC) + BDO for failing to cooperate with the Commission investigating potentially fraudulent behavior of Chinese companies that went public in the US. The auditors could be sanctioned or even excluded from operating within the US. read article (including another angry picture of enforcement director Robert Khumzami)

In fiscal cliff newsrepublicans put a new (old) proposal on the table, which already got rejected by the White House this morning. The proposal included $800bn in tax increases over the next 10 years, paired with a number of cuts, including scarping $600bn from Obama’s Medicare program. According to the Wall Street Journal, the proposal looked a lot like a the outlines of a budget deal discussed by Obama and Johgn Boehner, speaker of the House of Representatives, in 2011, the last time America stood at the cliff. Interestingly, Boehner’s proposal “also did not specify how Congress would address the $110 billion in spending cuts set to take effect Jan. 2 in defense and discretionary spending.” read article

But that’s not the only thing on Obama‘s mind. Another one is how to compensate those who have raised the most funds for his re-election. One of them is Anna Wintour, editor-in-chief of Vogue US and the very original devil in Prada. And to say thank you, Obama might make her the American ambassador to the UKread article

The IMF has released a staff paper saying that capital controls may be beneficial to countries whose economies are struggling and unable to deal with the volatility attached to capital inflows. Previously, the IMF was vehemently against capital controls, despite their use in some emerging economies. Now, however, it argues like this:

The experiences of Spain and Indonesia, as well as Brazil and Korea during the global crisis, highlight how regulations or re-imposition of restrictions on certain transactions can mitigate the build-up of vulnerabilities.

Spain!!! You know what that means. Next thing we know, there will be capital controls all over Europe’s peripheryread article 

Meanwhile, at a morning conference in London, major Boris Johnson said that a renegotiation of the UK’s relationship with Brussels was a necessary step forward and should lead to a straight forward referendum regarding the current terms and conditions that tie Britain to the single market. read article

In Doha, British Energy Secretary Ed Davey said the UK was going to put £1.8bn towards the battle against climate change. This will include financial support to cut emissions in developing countries. Britain is the first G7 country to commit to the project. read article

So long.

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