Death Star Economics

Icon

ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

Eurozone recession here to stay, UK gets ready for exit

Yesterday…
David Cameron and his comrades of the Conservative Party published a policy draft for a referendum for a possible EU-exit of the UK. The draft says the referendum has to be completed by December 2017, given the Tories win the 2015 elections. I think the campaigning just began. read BBC

While the global “recovery” continues to force deficits to skyrocket and imports to slump, India has managed to become the outlier in the trend on Monday afternoon. Taking advantage of the low gold price, imports rose 138% since April 2012 to $7.5bn, or 18% of all imports, while the trade deficit hit 17.8bn. read Zerohedge

And of course the drama over Bloomberg‘s use of user data continued… read FT Alphaville

This morning…
there was a flood of data, with the German economy growing 0.1% from 4Q12 to the first quarter of 2013, undercutting the depressing estimate of 0.3% growth. The French economy contracted by 0.2% over the same period of time. read Bloomberg
Franco-German relations haven’t been great since Hollande got into office, but this morning’s result may just worsen the atmosphere of any policy discussion. The eurozone as such, contracted 0.2% in 1Q13. The recession continues…

Simultaneously, Mervyn “it’s-almost-his-last-day” King of the Bank of England raised the outlook for the UK economy [with lower inflation] and raised his eyebrows at eurozone performance, as well as the continental Financial Transaction Tax. read Guardian

Meanwhile, the US is preparing to become the model student again. The Congressional Budget Office is forecasting the deficit to fall as far as $378bn by 2015, much faster than anticipated. The 2013 forecast was cut by $203bn to an overall $642bn. read Reuters
And that is not all: Formerly the largest corporate debt market in the world, providing ample opportunity for the Michael Milken followers of the world to make money, China is going to take that spot within the next two years, according to S&P. Soon America will be debt and deficit free and flow with milk and vodka (we’re all grown-ups here). read Financial Times

In the kerfuffle over whether Jamie Dimon is allowed to stay in in his double-role as chairman and CEO of JPMorgan seems to be blowing over (much like Lloyd Blankfein expected), as fewer shareholders than expected are looking to back the leadership reform. Another bullet dodged for the industry. read Financial Times

And in case you’ve been in a good mood this morning, have a look at this: 10 Scenes from the ongoing global economic collapse (Zerohedge)

So long.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Spain turns to stimuli, as Merkel points to two-tier Europe

Yesterday…
Spain’s unemployment rate rose to a new high of 27.2%, possibly marking the final point that austerity measures haven’t work in this case or simply don’t work at all (hello, Keynesians). Between January and March, almost 240,000 people lost their jobs. read BBC
Following the announcement, Mariano Rajoy announced the government would lay low on cuts and tax hikes, as even though the deficit has shrunk, the country is doing miserable. Stimulus for everyone! read WSJ

The UK dodged the bullet on a triple-drip recession, reporting first quarter GDP growth of 0.3% from the previous quarter

This morning…
Angela Merkel stirred the European debate with remarks about the potential impending rate cut by the ECB. Merkel pointed out that country’s like Germany actually needed a rate increase, while other country’s required further easing, underlining the divide between functional and dysfunctional Europe.

In Italy, coalition building is underway. Prime Minister-to be Enrico Letta said the conservatives would have to work out a compromise regarding the property tax that Berlusconi promised to get rid off before joining the coalition.

Today, the US is announcing first quarter GDP growth, which is expected to come in at 3% from the final quarter of 2012. Over the next three months, this number will be revised three times, once due to the change in government statistics in late July. read WSJ

In Japan, consumer prices have fallen fastest in two years in March, which doesn’t really come as a surprise considering all the excess liquidity in the system. Prices fell 0.5% on the year, slightly more than expected. read Bloomberg

Weekend reading:
Italy’s new heads of state – an evalution, read The Economist
– meet Janet “anti-inflation” Yellen, possibly the next head of the Fed, read NYTimes
– why the city of Los Angeles is suing Deutsche Bank, read Businessweek
real bad boys smuggle dairy, read Bloomberg

Have a good one.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

All according to plan – US set to grow 3%; China’s slowdown on purpose

Over the weekend…
the UK lost its Fitch-assigned AAA rating on the back of the weak economy and poor outlook. Moody’s downgraded the country in February, but also assigned a negative outlook, while Fitch is optimistic that the UK will return to credit-worthy prosperity around 2014/2015. read article

In Italy, Giorgio Napolitano was re-elected President for the coming seven years on Saturday. The independent is expected to propose a bipartisan cabinet, considering that he was elected by both sides of the political spectrum to avoid another round of elections. Everybody except for Beppe Grillo seems happy; he had called Napolitano’s re-election a coup d’etat. read article

The G20 meeting ended with everyone promising to not engage in competitive devaluation of currencies, defending Japan’s monetary policy as appropriate and targeting domestic demand. read article

This morning…
word got out that the US will see 3% growth in July, due to a reform of the methodology behind government statistics. 21st century GDP also takes film royalties and R&D spending into account:

Billions of dollars of intangible assets will enter the gross domestic product of the world’s largest economy in a revision aimed at capturing the changing nature of US output.” read article

Meanwhile in China, central bank Governor Zhou Xiaochuan justified the country’s below-expectations growth rate of 7.7% in the first quarter of 2013, saying slow growth was necessary as structural reforms are being put into place. read article

Otherwise the counter-austerity voices are getting louder again, this time it’s Pimco’s Bill Gross (not that surprising) and Jose Manuel Barroso of all people, the President of the European Commission. Could this be the beginning of the end of Angela Austerity Merkel’s dominance in European policy? Probably not.

So long.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A new benchmark fixing scandal!!

Yesterday…

former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher died of a stroke at the age of 87. Despite her polarizing character, there seems to be a consensus of her importance to the role of the UK on the global stage, both economically and politically. Finally, she also remains Britain’s only female PM. Most used terms: ‘liberalization’, ‘relentless’, ‘unforgiving’, ‘open markets’. read article

In the US, we see the beginning of a new benchmark fixing scandal: interdealer broker ICAP and some unnamed banks have been subpoenaed by the CFTC yesterday for potentially fixing the interest rate swap benchmark ISDAFIX. read article

Asset manager BlackRock has hit back at the Fed’s QE program, saying it distorted the markets. This is quite a change in BlackRock’s stance, as the company was all over government debt before until it started to nudge investors into less interest rate-sensitive products. read article

Following the court ruling that restricted Portugal‘s austerity measures last week, the country could see delays for future funds and no revision of the repayment schedule. According to the FT:

The court ruling means Lisbon will not receive the next €2bn installment of its €78bn bailout until it has convinced international lenders that fresh cuts in spending on health, education and social security will be sufficient to compensate for the rejected measures.

This morning…

we got CPI data from China, showing lower inflation at 2.1%, with food price inflation down from 6% in February (i.e. the Lunar New Year is a ripoff) to 2.7%.

In the UK factory output rose by 0.8% in February, more than the median estimate of 0.4% as according to Bloomberg, while German exports slumped in February, just to see imports decline by more than double the rate at -3.8%. read article

So long.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

US housing improving, Europe worsening as a whole

Over the long weekend…Starting positive, the US saw the release of some positive housing data, the “highest level of home building in more than four years”, while factory activity declined. read article

In Europe on the other hand, manufacturing went down down down across the board, yes, even Germany. According to Reuters, Cyprus is not the culprit. Maybe March was an outlier and the global recovery is still going strong *cough*. Other European data showed a steady 12% seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for the eurozone in Feburary. For the entire union, this number increased by 0.1% to 10.9%.

It’s only been a week and Cyprus, clearly coached by Greece, has already managed to have its bailout terms eased. The Wall Street Journal got hold of a document showing that the country will have until 2017 ( as opposed to 2016) to reach a 4% budget surplus. As for the capital controls put in place to prevent a bank run after tellers were open for business again on Thursday, may last for more than a week, according to Cyprus central bank governor Panicos Demetriades (see below).

Another country shifting around on the brink of collapse, Argentina, is trying to impress (read distract) its loyal (read angry) bondholders with a new deal: instead of discussing the repayment of old bonds per se, new bonds (different for retail and institutional investors) could be issued and paid off in about 25 years. Where do I sign, that sounds like a great idea. read article

This morning…
The week ahead looks quiet yet depressing, at least if you’re in Europe, but I will spend as much time as possible laughing about Demetriades first name PANICos.

On Thursday will be central banking day, with the Bank of Japan, Bank of England and European Central Bank holding their policy meetings.

Finally, today marks the death of the FSA as we know it and the advent of the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority. The former is an independent shop supervising more or less everybody in financial services (brokers, traders, secretaries, markets…), while the latter is part of the bank of England and will focus on 1,700 banks, insurers and investment firms. read article

Have a good week.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cypriot banks re-open, German unemployment higher

Yesterday…
word got out that UK banks Lloyds and Royal Bank of Scotland, both backed by tax money, needed to raise an additional £9bn in correspondence to capital requirements set by international banking regulators. The additional cash needs to be on the balance sheets (£3bn for Lloyds, £6bn for RBS) by the end of this year. read article

This morning…
Cyprus is making history by being the first EU country to impose restrictions on capital flows, “with limits on credit card transactions, daily withdrawals, money transfers abroad and the cashing of cheques.” The withdrawal limit seems to be €300 per day, while transfers of more than €5,000 will require central bank approval. read article

German unemployment rose by 13,000 people, as opposed to an expected drop, while German 10-year bunds dropped to their lowest yield since early August 2012 (1.255%).

Meanwhile in Asia, the Bank of Japan has already exceeded its self-imposed limit on asset purchasing limit (well done) and South Korea cut its 2013 growth forecast from 3% to 2.3%.

Easter reading… – a list of people who are investigating JP Morgan, read article
– what extremely successful people were doing in their 20s, read article
– greatness of nations: India vs China, read article

Happy Easter, have a good one.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cyprus to exit the news

Over the weekend…

actually right before, Fitch but the UK on its watchlist for downgrades.

The United States Congress is working on reforming the taxability of debt and equity, changing the traditional debt-bias (i.e. tax-deductible interest payments) to an equity-bias. read article

The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision received at hat tip that there was a MASSIVE loophole in the Basel III regulation that imposes, among other things, higher capital standards on banks. What it doesn’t regulate, however, is the use of credit default swaps to handle riskier assets that count into those capital standards. Changes to be made. read article

Speaking of Basel – after Switzerland came under scrutiny (again) by facilitating tax avoidance, the US Department of Justice has now asked Lichtenstein to hand over documentation of American-held accounts. read article

Over night…

The Eurogroup of Finance Ministers approved troika-sponsored bailout plan for Cyprus, totalling €10bn. In short, bank deposits under €100,000 will be guaranteed, while larger deposits are facing a crazy haircut, possibly up to 40% (others say the cuts will be capped at 20%). After ten days closure, Cypriot banks re-open todayread article

And let’s not forget that besides all this, we’re still waiting on Italy.

Have a good week.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Brussels vs Moscow, and Bernanke leaving the Fed

Yesterday…

the Federal Reserve confirmed its asset purchasing program worth $85bn per month to continue until the US economy would improve past the first scarce signs of recovery. read article

Ben Bernanke also alluded to leaving the Fed to pursue other projects, retirement for example. read article

The UK budget saw five more years of spending cuts, right past the 2015 elections to alleviate the country from its £121bn budget deficit and ensure its credit rating. The Office of Budget Responsibility expects 2013 growth to be at 0.6%, followed by 1.8% in 2014read article

Elsewhere, this happened over the course of yesterday: Cyprus’ Finance Minister conferred with Russia, while Angela Merkel said Cypriot banks had to chip in for the bailout, followed by Brussels saying that Cyprus had to present its own refinancing plan after voting against the EU proposal. It all looked like we had a new credible exit candidate until Cyprus asked for more time to come up with a better idea. Now it just looks like Greece. Here are four scenarios that could unfold over the coming days and weeks.

This morning…

The European Central Bank announced that Cyprus had until 25 March, coming Monday, to get its bailout plan ready without losing access to the ECB’s Emergency Liquidity Assistance (ELA) that keeps the island’s banks alive. read article

Finally, China released some promising manufacturing data, showing the sector expand faster than expected and giving the recovery hypothesis more support. read article

So long.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A bailout with a side of bank-run

Good morning, due to new commitments Death Star Economics gets up early now.

After Cyprus exploded in such an unexpected fashion on Monday, followed by the revision of the bank account levy proposal assigning a 15% tax on deposits above €500,000 and a closing of all banks until Thursday [making ZeroHedge wonder which Thursday…], which was then followed by the Cypriot parliament rejecting the proposal altogether. In the background, Russia has appeared on a white horse, sending Gazprom to offer to bail the country out for nothing butaccess to its natural resources [and money laundering facilities]. Cyprus’ Finance Minister is currently in Moscow.

In the background, the EU reached a provisional deal on the ECB’s role as single bank supervisor in the Union. Once in place, the reformed central bank could bail out European banks directly. read article

It’s budget day in the UK today, and once again it won’t be pretty. Expected are 2% spendingcuts, totalling £2.5bn. Also, inflation sits at 2.8% in February and in-coming Bank of England Governor Mark Carney wants to focus on more indicators than just getting that number down. There is the possibility that the budget will steer the BoE bank onto the 2% inflation target courseread article

BlackRock, the largest asset manager in the world, is set to restructure the firm and fire 300 people, about 3% of its global workforce. read article

In regulatory news, Citigroup has to pay $730m in settlement fees for misleading investors in mortgage-related (read “-backed”) securities between 2006 and 2008. Crisis-era legal case #765.read article

UBS decided to leave the panel that sets the Euribor benchmark rate. Previously, Rabobank, Raiffeisen Bank, Bayrische Landesbank and Citi had left the panel. read article

Have a good day.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Judgment day for J.P. Morgan

There won’t be an email on Monday and Tuesday of next week, 18/19 March 2012.

Today, the London Whale Senate hearing starts in DC, led by John McCain and including testimony from former CIO Ina Drew who left the firm in May 2012. The allegations include a failure to appropriately report on the $6bn trading losses, misleading regulators and investors. read article

Following the Fed stress testBank of America is set to buy back $5bn of shares and $5.5bn of preferred stock, while J.P. Morgan will buy back $6bn in common stock. Goldman Sachs will also be allowed to repurchase shares, but overall the Fed seems worried about J.P. Morgan‘s and Goldman‘s capital structures: the banks will have to submit revised capital plans by September. read article

The British Parliamentary Commission on Banking Standards (PCBS) stated that the UK didn’t need a ban on proprietary trading, mirrored from the American Volcker rule. The Commission suggested capital requirements as alternative tools and cited the difficulty of defining proprietary trading appropriately. Future BoE Governor Mark Carney agrees as well. read article

After months of investigations and grounded fleets, Boeing’s Dreamliners could be back in the air “within weeks”. The spontaneously igniting batteries have been replaced and “only” need approval from the Federal Aviation Administration to be ready for take-off. Japanese authorities remain skeptical and declined to put a date on when the Dreamliners could fly again. Either way, Boeing doesn’t have the capacity to replace batteries in all 50 active planes simultaneouslyread article

While the EU-US trade agreement is in the works, Japan has entered negotiations for a similar deal for Pacific nations. read article

Meanwhile, Greece, or rather the Hellenic Republic Asset Development Fund, is selling gas and gambling companies as part of its privatization campaign. Get in there while it’s cheap. read article

Last night, Samsung launched its latest smart phone in the Radio City Music Hall in New York. A review from All Things D, here.

Weekend reading:

– the America we used to know, read article

– the US is more energy self-sufficient, except China wants to own all their natural gas fueling stationsread article

– when hedge funds get personal: the Herbalife background storyread article

 Have a good weekend.

Filed under: news brief, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 213 other followers

%d bloggers like this: