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ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

Europe is the new Japan – ECB cuts rates

Yesterday…The Fed’s FOMC meeting notes showed that we’re moving away from the “let’s close the money tap” idea and back to “whatever it takes” – meaning easing or no easing. The statement said that policy action will be taken with an eye on how the economy will progress. read Alphaville (interestingly, Matthew Yglesias of Slate has interpreted this as a call for stimulus)

Apple‘s mega bond of $17m helps the company to avoid $9bn in taxes. If Apple would have had to bring in money from abroad to pay dividends to shareholders, that’s what it would have cost them. Of course, the average Apple customer, like me, doesn’t care about tax avoidance (it’s not even illegal), but the American state is upset, as it’s trying to crack down on offshore tax avoidance like never before this year. read FT

Otherwise, an infographic to yesterday’s ADP employment report. view graphic

This morning…
all eyes are on the ECB, which just announced a benchmark interest rate cut by a quarter point to 0.50%. A press conference during which Mario Draghi will wear a suit made of money is set to follow at 1.30 BST. Let the excitement begin. Money for everyone.

UBS is holding an investor meeting today, during which the bank may be urged to split its investment banking and wealth management units [again]. read Reuters

So long.

Death Star Economics
ECONOMICS – FINANCE – WORLD NEWS – GREEK DEBT

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Slovenia slides down the bailout slope

Yesterday

The Fed is considering tougher capital requirements over worries that banks could be playing the [Basel III] system. Currently, the international agreement sees equity capital at only 3%. Basel brought that up significantly, but also gave the parties involved more room for… creative accounting. Give a bank a loophole. read FT

Moody’s downgraded Slovenia to junk with negative outlook (ouch), which is unfortunate, because the country was planning to auction off some debt. read FT
And now the pathway to an EU bailout: (read Bloomberg)

Rising loan losses resulting from a housing bust and a second recession in two years have left a hole of about 7.5 billion euros ($9.9 billion) at Slovenia-based lenders, investment bank Keefe Bruyette & Woods estimates. That’s a lot for a 35 billion-euro economy: A bank bailout would push government debt above 70 percent of economic output.

Apple issued $17bn in debt – the largest corporate debt offering ever – in six tranches to return money to shareholders and avoid repatriation taxes on overseas funds. read WSJ

In New York, the Empire State Building was lit up in FT-pink to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the newspaper.

This morning…
is quiet due to Labor Day in vast parts of the world.

Later on, we’ll get some data from the US, including the ADP employment report, ISM manufacturing data and the post-FOMC meeting statement from the Fed (ex Bernanke press conference). The ISM is expected to drop below 50, as it last did in November of last year and several months in 2009.

So long.

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US budget deficit decreases; ECB rate cut likely

Yesterday…
The IMF warned of the Asian bubble, saying too much FDI was leading to explosive credit growth and property prices, and it was to get even worse if Japan’s monetary policy was to have the intended effect on the Japanese economy (hold your horses, Christine). read FT

Deutsche Bank is issuing €2.8bn of new stock to improve its capital base. According to WSJ, Deutsche Bank has one of the lowest capital ratios among European banks. read WSJ

This morning…
The Dutch Queen Beatrix abdicated, to be replaced by her son Willem-Alexander. She will be demoted to Princess Beatrix. read BBC

The US Treasury is expecting the first lowering of the budget deficit since 2007 between April and June 2013, when it is looking to repay $35bn, against the February estimate of shouldering another $103bn in debt. The deficit cut is due to tax increases, spending cuts and tax revenues recoveries. read FT

There was a whole flood of data out of Europe this morning: both Eurozone and German inflation came in at 1.2%, lower than expected, making a rate cut by the ECB on Thursday more likely. German unemployment added to its rise in March, but the adjusted rate is still only marginally above the two-decade low of 6.8%. Eurozone unemployment climbed to 12.1%. No surprise there, when has it not been rising… read Alphaville

Spain reported GDP growth for the first quarter – keyword ‘growth’ – at -0.5%, leading the Bank of Spain to lower it 2013 growth expectations from -0.5% to -1.3%. read CNBC

So long.

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Spain turns to stimuli, as Merkel points to two-tier Europe

Yesterday…
Spain’s unemployment rate rose to a new high of 27.2%, possibly marking the final point that austerity measures haven’t work in this case or simply don’t work at all (hello, Keynesians). Between January and March, almost 240,000 people lost their jobs. read BBC
Following the announcement, Mariano Rajoy announced the government would lay low on cuts and tax hikes, as even though the deficit has shrunk, the country is doing miserable. Stimulus for everyone! read WSJ

The UK dodged the bullet on a triple-drip recession, reporting first quarter GDP growth of 0.3% from the previous quarter

This morning…
Angela Merkel stirred the European debate with remarks about the potential impending rate cut by the ECB. Merkel pointed out that country’s like Germany actually needed a rate increase, while other country’s required further easing, underlining the divide between functional and dysfunctional Europe.

In Italy, coalition building is underway. Prime Minister-to be Enrico Letta said the conservatives would have to work out a compromise regarding the property tax that Berlusconi promised to get rid off before joining the coalition.

Today, the US is announcing first quarter GDP growth, which is expected to come in at 3% from the final quarter of 2012. Over the next three months, this number will be revised three times, once due to the change in government statistics in late July. read WSJ

In Japan, consumer prices have fallen fastest in two years in March, which doesn’t really come as a surprise considering all the excess liquidity in the system. Prices fell 0.5% on the year, slightly more than expected. read Bloomberg

Weekend reading:
Italy’s new heads of state – an evalution, read The Economist
– meet Janet “anti-inflation” Yellen, possibly the next head of the Fed, read NYTimes
– why the city of Los Angeles is suing Deutsche Bank, read Businessweek
real bad boys smuggle dairy, read Bloomberg

Have a good one.

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Obama ready to cut social security for budget deal

Yesterday…
it was all about central banks: the Bank of Japan expanded its asset purchasing program to JPY7tn per month, which will increase the Japanese monetary base to JPY270tn – double – by early 2014. read article

Both the Bank of England and the ECB left their policies alone. Mario Draghi shared mixed views of the European economy, saying it was to benefit from improving financial markets sometime soon, while bank lending was negative and needed encouraging. Interest rate cuts are possible again.

This morning…
we’re waiting for US non-farm payrolls, expected to show 190,000-200,000 jobs added in March (according to Bloomberg and Dow Jones respectively), as opposed to 236,000 in February, with a steady unemployment rate of 7.7. read article

President Obama is willing to cut social security spending to finally get a budget deal together, the White House announced this morning. The new proposal would see cuts worth $1.8tn over the next decade and will piss off a lot of Democrats and unions. read article

Weekend reading…
women and Wall Street (again) read article
– why the French are an un’appy folk, read article
– the deal with interest rates, read article

Have a good weekend.

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US housing improving, Europe worsening as a whole

Over the long weekend…Starting positive, the US saw the release of some positive housing data, the “highest level of home building in more than four years”, while factory activity declined. read article

In Europe on the other hand, manufacturing went down down down across the board, yes, even Germany. According to Reuters, Cyprus is not the culprit. Maybe March was an outlier and the global recovery is still going strong *cough*. Other European data showed a steady 12% seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for the eurozone in Feburary. For the entire union, this number increased by 0.1% to 10.9%.

It’s only been a week and Cyprus, clearly coached by Greece, has already managed to have its bailout terms eased. The Wall Street Journal got hold of a document showing that the country will have until 2017 ( as opposed to 2016) to reach a 4% budget surplus. As for the capital controls put in place to prevent a bank run after tellers were open for business again on Thursday, may last for more than a week, according to Cyprus central bank governor Panicos Demetriades (see below).

Another country shifting around on the brink of collapse, Argentina, is trying to impress (read distract) its loyal (read angry) bondholders with a new deal: instead of discussing the repayment of old bonds per se, new bonds (different for retail and institutional investors) could be issued and paid off in about 25 years. Where do I sign, that sounds like a great idea. read article

This morning…
The week ahead looks quiet yet depressing, at least if you’re in Europe, but I will spend as much time as possible laughing about Demetriades first name PANICos.

On Thursday will be central banking day, with the Bank of Japan, Bank of England and European Central Bank holding their policy meetings.

Finally, today marks the death of the FSA as we know it and the advent of the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority. The former is an independent shop supervising more or less everybody in financial services (brokers, traders, secretaries, markets…), while the latter is part of the bank of England and will focus on 1,700 banks, insurers and investment firms. read article

Have a good week.

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Cypriot banks re-open, German unemployment higher

Yesterday…
word got out that UK banks Lloyds and Royal Bank of Scotland, both backed by tax money, needed to raise an additional £9bn in correspondence to capital requirements set by international banking regulators. The additional cash needs to be on the balance sheets (£3bn for Lloyds, £6bn for RBS) by the end of this year. read article

This morning…
Cyprus is making history by being the first EU country to impose restrictions on capital flows, “with limits on credit card transactions, daily withdrawals, money transfers abroad and the cashing of cheques.” The withdrawal limit seems to be €300 per day, while transfers of more than €5,000 will require central bank approval. read article

German unemployment rose by 13,000 people, as opposed to an expected drop, while German 10-year bunds dropped to their lowest yield since early August 2012 (1.255%).

Meanwhile in Asia, the Bank of Japan has already exceeded its self-imposed limit on asset purchasing limit (well done) and South Korea cut its 2013 growth forecast from 3% to 2.3%.

Easter reading… – a list of people who are investigating JP Morgan, read article
– what extremely successful people were doing in their 20s, read article
– greatness of nations: India vs China, read article

Happy Easter, have a good one.

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A bailout with a side of bank-run

Good morning, due to new commitments Death Star Economics gets up early now.

After Cyprus exploded in such an unexpected fashion on Monday, followed by the revision of the bank account levy proposal assigning a 15% tax on deposits above €500,000 and a closing of all banks until Thursday [making ZeroHedge wonder which Thursday…], which was then followed by the Cypriot parliament rejecting the proposal altogether. In the background, Russia has appeared on a white horse, sending Gazprom to offer to bail the country out for nothing butaccess to its natural resources [and money laundering facilities]. Cyprus’ Finance Minister is currently in Moscow.

In the background, the EU reached a provisional deal on the ECB’s role as single bank supervisor in the Union. Once in place, the reformed central bank could bail out European banks directly. read article

It’s budget day in the UK today, and once again it won’t be pretty. Expected are 2% spendingcuts, totalling £2.5bn. Also, inflation sits at 2.8% in February and in-coming Bank of England Governor Mark Carney wants to focus on more indicators than just getting that number down. There is the possibility that the budget will steer the BoE bank onto the 2% inflation target courseread article

BlackRock, the largest asset manager in the world, is set to restructure the firm and fire 300 people, about 3% of its global workforce. read article

In regulatory news, Citigroup has to pay $730m in settlement fees for misleading investors in mortgage-related (read “-backed”) securities between 2006 and 2008. Crisis-era legal case #765.read article

UBS decided to leave the panel that sets the Euribor benchmark rate. Previously, Rabobank, Raiffeisen Bank, Bayrische Landesbank and Citi had left the panel. read article

Have a good day.

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The next thing – gold price fixing

Things to know today: The new pope is Argentinian (or Argentine if you will) and the first non-European in 1,272 years; the US continues to fail at making the budget happen; Libor, Euribor, now gold and silver, ALL PRICES ARE FIXED.

The US is seeing Republican and Democratic budget proposals this week, with the former having been released on Tuesday. So far so good, surely a compromise can be found, right? No. In an interview with ABC Obama admitted that the two proposals may be too different to be combined in any shape or form, particularly if the Republican idea only relies on cutting social security and healthcare benefits. read article

The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) has begun an inquiry in the gold and silver market in London. Though not a ‘real’ investigation yet, the Commission is looking into price fixing, much as they did with Libor. The banks involved in gold price setting in London are BarclaysDeutsche BankHSBCBank of Nova Scotia and Societe Generaleread article

The troika, composed of the EU, ECB and IMF, has decided to delay the latest bailout tranche for Greece, worth €2.8bn, due to “outstanding issues”. One of these could be firing public servants:

Identifying redundant positions and putting in place a system that will lead to mandatory exits for about 150,000 civil servants by 2015 is a so-called milestone that will determine whether the country gets a 2.8 billion-euro aid instalment due this month.

Otherwise, Eurostat released a handful of data including rising Greek youth unemployment (record) and low overall European employment (lowest since 2006). In Brussels, the European leader summit has begun. Rumor has it that France, Spain and Portugal will get more time to shrink their deficitsread article

So long.

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BoJ to buy derivatives; US unemployment down to 7.7%

Haruhiko Kuroda, who is likely to be confirmed as the next governor of the Bank of Japan soon enough, declared that he will look into buying derivatives to send a strong message regarding the BoJ’s willingness to continue stimulating the economy. Kuroda, unlike many economists, doesn’t think the 2% inflation target would be at risk following this move. The last time a central bank engaged in derivatives purchases as part of their monetary policy was in 2008, as part of the Federal Reserve’s rescue program of Bear Stearns. read article 

Meanwhile, Japanese manufacturing isn’t doing so well, with machinery order having dropped 13.1% between December and January, showing that the economy is slow to respond to the new government and its actions. According to the WSJ, the median estimate had only been -1.4%. read article 

Over the weekend, there was a bunch of economic data from China giving mixed indications for 2013:

The short version is that some growth indicators were significantly weaker than expected, but others beat consensus forecasts – and consumer inflation appears to be on the rise again, even when the new year effect is discounted. This comes after strong export growth and weak import data surprised everyone late last week.

And right before the weekend, the US jobs report came in quite positive, cutting the unemployment rate to 7.7%, a number last achieved in 2008. read article

After much clamoring over financial regulation from Brussels, the UK’s Parliamentary Commission on Banking Standards has now deemed the British government’s own regulatory proposal too weak, back-stabbingly risking tighter rules for City banks than elsewhere on the continent… or so the FT writes. All in all, it remains to be said that there will be regulation – and everyone knows that – the degree of which may be a lot less important than whether or not it is sensible and appropriate. To be continued.

On that note, a [last] defense of banker bonuses, conveniently summarized in an RSA-like cartoon drawing (including some critical notes from Alphaville). read article 

Otherwise, Intrade has put its website services on hold due to an investigation into possible “financial irregularities”. read article

As for the rest of the week, there will be industrial production data from all around Europe, as well as unemployment and inflation numbers on Friday.

Have a good week.

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